Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have read at least one class should contain Main method since the entry point of execution is the Main(). Lets see the code below.

using System;
namespace consoleApplication
{
    class sample
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Demo program");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

We know that a static method inside a class can be invoked using dot operator with the class name. So can we call Main() as

sample.Main();

just like we call

Console.WriteLine();

and kindly tell me whether it is syntactically right or not even if we are not using the same.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Erik Philips, DavidO, Stu, Druid, Jason Sturges Jul 27 '12 at 2:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Are you asking why you don't have to call Main in your code? If so, it's because the OS is doing it for you. –  asawyer Jul 24 '12 at 19:04
    
How is it not done like that? –  Pacane Jul 24 '12 at 19:04
4  
How would you propose to call the code which then calls sample.Main? –  Jon Skeet Jul 24 '12 at 19:06
1  
You must add an assembly in Project settings - References, and then use your Main() as consoleApplication.sample.Main(); –  nsinreal Jul 24 '12 at 19:15
1  
If you want to write sample.Main() you need to write using consoleApplication; in head of your source-file –  nsinreal Jul 24 '12 at 19:17
show 5 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By default the class and Main() method are created as private members. If you absolutely wanted to, you could make them public members then call them from another project.

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class sample
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("My Output...");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            sample.Main();
        }
    }
}

Output: "My Output..."

However, I do not know why this would be necessary. This is what libraries are created for. I would instead create a class library and make my static class/methods within it.

Your Main() method is simply the entry point for your console application. Every application has an entry point. I cannot think of a use case in which you would create several application projects, then call the Main() methods from other projects. I would instead, make a new project that will be used as a library, not an application. This is what a class library is meant for.

The answer to the last question, is this syntactically correct? Yes. Again, I stress that this is not good practice. From MSDN "Main must be static and it should not be public." Just because it can be done, does not mean that it should be.

share|improve this answer
    
@asawyer Not for the two I just created in Visual Studio 2010... static void Main(string[] args) –  jsmith Jul 24 '12 at 19:20
    
I retract my statement. I must have edited it ages ago for some reason and forgot. Sorry! :) –  asawyer Jul 24 '12 at 19:24
    
Not sure why I got the downvote.. This absolutely works, I didn't say it was a good idea. But you CAN do it... Please give reason for downvote. –  jsmith Jul 24 '12 at 19:27
    
see guys, I just want to know whether it could be done or not and it doesn't mean that I am trying to achieve certain functionality using this. –  Unni Jul 24 '12 at 19:51
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.