Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to implement a tail recursive version of factorial:

let{factorial 0 n = n; factorial x n =  factorial (x-1, n * x)}

I get this:

<interactive>:1:41:
Occurs check: cannot construct the infinite type: t1 = t1 -> t1
In the return type of a call of `factorial'
In the expression: factorial (x - 1, n * x)
In an equation for `factorial':
    factorial x n = factorial (x - 1, n * x)

<interactive>:1:52:
Occurs check: cannot construct the infinite type: t0 = (t0, t1)
In the first argument of `(-)', namely `x'
In the expression: x - 1
In the first argument of `factorial', namely `(x - 1, n * x)'

<interactive>:1:61:
Occurs check: cannot construct the infinite type: t1 = (t0, t1)
In the second argument of `(*)', namely `x'
In the expression: n * x
In the first argument of `factorial', namely `(x - 1, n * x)'

How am i constructing an infinite type here? (using GHCi 7.0.1)

share|improve this question
1  
If you give your definition type signatures, the error messages are usually easier to understand. You'd have gotten something along the lines of Couldn't match expected type `Integer' with actual type `(t0, t1)' then. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 24 '12 at 20:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm not a strong Haskell programmer, but I think you want to rewrite

factorial x n =  factorial (x-1, n * x)

as

factorial x n =  factorial (x-1) (n * x)

Since (x-1, n * x) is a pair type, which isn't what you want.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Ofcourse! Despite knowing about pairs, I'll blame my habit of passing args to a function, er.. 'non-functional programming way'? :) –  badmaash Jul 24 '12 at 19:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.