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Can someone explain why the value of the variable test isn't changed when I run the short code snippet below?

#include <stdio.h>

int f1(char * foo) {
    *foo = 'a';
    return 0;
}

void main(void) {
    char test = 'n';
    printf("f1(&test)=%d.  test's new value? : %c", f1(&test), test);
}

I know I'm probably missing something really simple. I just don't understand why test isn't changed in f1() because I'm passing it's address in, right? Why does it matter that the actual function call happens in the list of arguments to printf() ?

If I take the call to f1() out of the printf argument list like so:

#include <stdio.h>

int f1(char * foo) {
    *foo = 'a';
    return 0;
}

void main(void) {
    char test='n';
    int i;
    i = f1(&test);
    printf("f1(&test)=%d.  test's new value? : %c", i, test);
}

things work as expected.

thanks in advance.

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2  
You shouldn't use void main. – chris Jul 24 '12 at 19:39
    
shoot I missed test='n'; – Wug Jul 24 '12 at 19:47
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The order in which the arguments to a function call are evaluated is unspecified. Put another way, you can't tell for sure when f1(&test) will be evaluated.

So in your example, perhaps f1(&test) is evaluated after test: slightly counter-intuitively, you don't get to see the side effects of that invocation. But if you print test again after the call, you will indeed see them.


Bottom line, just be careful with function that have side-effects and you should be set.

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There is no set order in which function parameters are evaluated. You're banking on the idea that the arguments are evaluated left to right, which can't be assumed.

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okay thanks, that makes sense. I just tried it with another printf statement on the next line and by then the changes had taken effect. - should have thought of that! – vancan1ty Jul 24 '12 at 19:46

Just change where you make your function call

#include <stdio.h>                  

int f1 (char* foo) {                
        *foo='a';                   
        return 0;                   
}                                   

int main(void)                      
{                                   
        char test='n';              
        f1(&test);                  
        printf("test=%c\n", test);  

        return 0;                   
}                                   
share|improve this answer

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