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I'm starting the process of learning C++ and object oriented design. What are the known / common techniques for converting procedural code to object-oriented code? What design choices make sense for the following code?

typedef struct
{
    int sector;
    int sectorPos;
}EndPosition;

typedef struct
{
    int rotateAngles;
    double brakingFactor;
}WheelStop;

WheelStop stops[][6] =
{
     /* data removed for brevity */
};

typedef struct
{
    int numImages;      /* Number of images in win amount string */
    int pixWidth;
    int indexes[7];     /* indexes into NumberImages[] */
}WinAmountData;

typedef struct
{
    int xOffset;    /* pixel count offset before next digit */
    std::string fileName;
    //char fileName[20];
    cairo_surface_t *image; 
}ImageInfo;

ImageInfo NumberImages[] =
{
     /* data removed for brevity */
};

enum { DOLLAR = 10, EURO, POUND, YEN };

double DegreesToRadians( double degrees )
{
    return((double)((double)degrees * ( (double)M_PI/(double)180.0 )));
}

int InitImages( void )
{
     /* uses NumberImages */
}


void DestroyNumberImages( void )
{
      /* uses NumberImages */
}

int ParseWinAmountString( char *string, WinAmountData *amtData )
{
        /* uses WinAmountData and enum */
}

gboolean rotate_cb( void *StopPos )
{
      /* uses EndPosition and stops */
}

static gboolean on_expose_event(GtkWidget *widget, GdkEventExpose *event, gpointer data)
{
     /* uses CairoImage class */
}

static void destroy (GtkWidget *window, gpointer data)
{
     /* cleanup GTK stuff */
}

I've given it some thought, and I can see maybe two classes:

  • CWinAmount which would encompass the data structures and functions that handle the currency amounts to be placed on the "spinning wheel".
  • CWheel which would encapsulate the wheel data structures and functions that control the wheel animation mechanics.

But I'm just not sure if this is a good design.

share|improve this question
    
So this is a "fairly small" application :) –  Desolator Jul 24 '12 at 20:07
    
I wonder why SO users see fit to downvote anything that requires planning rather than writing code. Seems counterintuitive. –  Wug Jul 24 '12 at 20:08
    
@Desolator I think so. Less than 400 lines of code. Should I cut out some of the example code? –  Chimera Jul 24 '12 at 20:10
    
Yeah. This is a GiantWallOCode. We don't usually accept that. Also, there's no need to be prefixing your classes. –  Puppy Jul 24 '12 at 20:12
    
@JimNorton Yes, you should :). Most users prefer to read pieces of code that you have a problem with. If you want really to have ALL your code read, put it then at stackexchange.codereview rather. –  Desolator Jul 24 '12 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not going to provide exact details on how to do such a conversion (that's really up to you). But, your described approach sounds like a perfectly reasonable design. Generally when converting code to OO I find the most obvious groupings of functions and structs with shared state and wrap those together. Then I look at what functions are remained and try to determine if they belong to an existing object, have some relation that could justify grouping them, or leave them as generic functions (if I have the option).

In general there's no secret to converting to OO style and most approaches simply try to group any/all shared state/functionality into blocks (objects).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the help. I appreciate it. –  Chimera Jul 24 '12 at 20:22

In your case I would keep the data out of the classes themselves and look more so at the functionality with data values passed to it. This makes your design more extensible in that it does not tie itself to a particular set of data and acts more as a function over data instead of a deliverer of data.

I have always thought of OOP as a way to take in data and transform it through various filters without relying on internal data. This way you can subclass and further filter the data and perform more specific filtering. A filter does not contain and data, it really only contains the functionality to perform the filtering.

So, you would have two classes just like you have described, but they would take in data instead of encapsulating it.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the tip. –  Chimera Jul 24 '12 at 20:08

The number one thing you've gotta do is cut those global variables. They are destroying any semblance of maintainability from your code. The Init and Destroy methods could easily be a constructor and destructor, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks DeadMG. I appreciate it. I was lazy about the globals. The application started out just as a throw away piece of code to be used as a proof of concept. This is no longer the case. No globals will exist when it's fully converted to C++. –  Chimera Jul 24 '12 at 20:44

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