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I was taking a look at ASP.NET MVC 4 RC and cannot find DefaultHttpControllerFactory or even IHttpControllerFactory to allow my IoC container of choice (Castle Windsor) to hook into the framework for Web Api controllers. I ended up using IDependencyResolver which makes releasing components a bit trickier, but ended up with the following. Is it going to work / not memory leak until IDependencyResolver has a Release method? Global.asax ends up as:

public class WebApiApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    private IWindsorContainer container;

    protected void Application_Start()
    {
        AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

        FilterConfig.RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
        RouteConfig.RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);
        BundleConfig.RegisterBundles(BundleTable.Bundles);

        Windsor();
    }

    protected void Application_End()
    {
        container.Dispose();
    }

    private void Windsor()
    {
        container = new WindsorContainer().Install(FromAssembly.This());

        // mvc:
        var mvcControllerFactory = new WindsorControllerFactory(container.Kernel);
        ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(mvcControllerFactory);

        // web api:
        var httpDependencyResolver = new WindsorHttpDependencyResolver(container.Kernel);
        GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.DependencyResolver = httpDependencyResolver;
    }
}

WindsorControllerFactory is extension of DefaultControllerFactory for Mvc Controllers and there is a Windsor installer for them. WindsorHttpDependencyResolver ends up as:

public class WindsorHttpDependencyResolver : System.Web.Http.Dependencies.IDependencyResolver
{
    private readonly IKernel kernel;

    public WindsorHttpDependencyResolver(IKernel kernel)
    {
        this.kernel = kernel;
    }

    public IDependencyScope BeginScope()
    {
        return kernel.Resolve<IDependencyScope>(); // instances released suitably (at end of web request)
    }

    public object GetService(Type serviceType)
    {
        // for ModelMetadataProvider and other MVC related types that may have been added to the container
        // check the lifecycle of these registrations
        return kernel.HasComponent(serviceType) ? kernel.Resolve(serviceType) : null;
    }

    public IEnumerable<object> GetServices(Type serviceType)
    {
        return kernel.HasComponent(serviceType) ? kernel.ResolveAll(serviceType) as IEnumerable<object> : Enumerable.Empty<object>();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
       // Nothing created so nothing to dispose - kernel will take care of its own
    }
}

Theoretically, this means Windsor will now provide the Api Controllers, once they are installed:

public class ApiControllersInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        container.AddFacility<TypedFactoryFacility>();
        container.Register(Component.For<ITypedFactoryComponentSelector>().ImplementedBy<WebApiTypedFactoryComponentSelector>());
        container.Register(Component.For<IDependencyScope>().AsFactory(tfc => tfc.SelectedWith<WebApiTypedFactoryComponentSelector>()).LifestylePerWebRequest());

        container.Register(Classes.FromAssemblyContaining<ValuesController>().BasedOn<IHttpController>().LifestyleTransient());
    }
}

I'm using the typed factory facility to implement IDependencyScope for me, which means when the framework disposes it at the end of a request, it will release the controller and its dependencies implicitly. By using a Per Web Request life cycle, Windsor will release the factory itself too. That just leaves the custom typed factory component selector as GetService(s) will not find anything in the container:

public class WebApiTypedFactoryComponentSelector : DefaultTypedFactoryComponentSelector
{
    protected override string GetComponentName(System.Reflection.MethodInfo method, object[] arguments)
    {
        if (method.Name == "GetService" || method.Name == "GetServices")
        {
            return (arguments[0] as Type).FullName;
        }
        return base.GetComponentName(method, arguments);
    }

    protected override Type GetComponentType(System.Reflection.MethodInfo method, object[] arguments)
    {
        if (method.Name == "GetService" || method.Name == "GetServices")
        {
            return arguments[0] as Type;
        }
        return base.GetComponentType(method, arguments);
    }
}

Hope this is useful.

share|improve this question
    
Is your question "Is it going to work / not memory leak until IDependencyResolver has a Release method?"? –  Jesse Webb Jul 24 '12 at 21:41
    
@Jesse I guess I'm trying to find out if this is a viable approach given the structure of MVC 4 RC. I think I've understood the Windsor docs correctly but if I've made a mistake somewhere, would be grateful if someone points it out. –  hagrid27 Jul 24 '12 at 22:00

1 Answer 1

I ended up using code from this blog post (further enhanced by this other one by Mark Seemann), which creates a scope per request and takes care of releasing the created objects. This is a slightly different approach to the one you've taken.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link, looks interesting. –  hagrid27 Aug 10 '12 at 21:59

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