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Im creating an employee class containing three fields nem, age and gender. I need to create a gender field but the user can only choose male or female. I'm guessing I'm going to have to do this in boolean form but I don't know how I'm going to do that can anyone help me out please.

So far i have

public class Employee {

private String name;
private int age;
private boolean gender;
private boolean male;
private boolean female;

public Employee(String name, int age, boolean gender) 
{
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;

    boolean f = female;
    boolean m = male;

    if (gender = f)
    {
        System.out.print("female");
    }

    else if (gender = m)
    {
        System.out.print("male");
    }
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public int getAge() {
    return age;
}

public void setAge(int age) {
    this.age = age;
}

public boolean isGender() {
    return gender;
}

public void setGender(boolean gender) 
{
    if (gender = f)
    {
        System.out.print("female");
    }

    else if (gender = m)
    {
        System.out.print("male");
    }
}
}
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2  
Why not use an enum instead of a boolean? –  JamesB Jul 24 '12 at 20:59
1  
Look up enum. –  JerseyMike Jul 24 '12 at 21:00
2  
How very gender-normative. –  millimoose Jul 24 '12 at 21:04

7 Answers 7

Better to use an enum for Gender:

public enum Gender {
    MALE, FEMALE
}
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If you are going to use a boolean, it should be called isMale or isFemale, and not isGender. Note that whichever you pick, someone will probably complain that their gender is regarded as false. This is a reason why an enum might be a better option.

Another reason a boolean might be inappropriate is that in some countries it is illegal in some situations to require people to disclose their gender. For this reason you may wish to provide an enum with three options: the third is to store that the gender was not disclosed.

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There are a couple things wrong here. First of all, in your if statements, you're assigning the value of f and m to gender with a single = operator. You need to do if (gender == true) or if (gender == false). Also, I recommend having true represent male or female and false represent the other gender.

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You can use a boolean or else you can create a Gender enum:

In Gender.java:

public enum Gender {
    MALE,
    FEMALE
}

In Employee.java:

public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int age;
    private Gender gender;

    public Employee(String name, int age, Gender gender) 
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.gender = gender;
        printGender();
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public Gender getGender() {
        return gender;
    }

    public void setGender(Gender gender) 
    {
        this.gender = gender;
    }

    public final void printGender() {
        System.out.println(gender.name().toLower());
    }    
}
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A boolean is not appropriate, and neither is a default value unless it is UNKNOWN. You need at least three values, maybe four. See this answer for a full discussion.

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If you're using Java 1.5 or later, you can (and should) use enum types, which provide strong typing, convenient/implementation-independent naming, and extensibility.

Example:

public enum Gender {
    MALE,
    FEMALE,
}

// usage example
myEmployee.setGender(Gender.FEMALE);
share|improve this answer

Two ideas:

1) Make a boolean like isMale or isFemale

2) Make a Gender Enum that only has Gender.MALE and Gender.FEMALE

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