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I have some weird issue with c program. I am learning c programming on-line and I practise some exercise. On of them is about a imagery technic called erosion. Imagine there is an image with two types of pixels symbolized by either '.' or '#'. When a pixel is surrounded by 4 '#' character, it is preserved, and in the other case it is replaced by a '.' character. The input is N the number of times the erosion is applied, H and L the height and width of the image, and a rectangle of characters composed by '.' and '#' character. For instance input :

1  //N
4  //H
4  //L
....
.###
####
####

and the output is 
....
....
.##.
....

The problem is that the on-line compiler (that tests a random serie of inputs) rejects my code telling that the memory is overflowed

Here is the code

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

//test wether a pixel is surrounded by 4 '#' characters
char test(int i, int j,int H, int L, char c[H][L]){

    int k=0;
    int l=0;
    char result='-';
    if((i==0)||(i==H-1)||(j==0)||(j==L-1)){
        result='+';
    }
    else{

    for(k=0;k<2;k++){
        for(l=0;l<2;l++){
              if(c[i+(1-2*k)*l][j+(1-2*k)*(1-l)] =='.'){
                result='+';

                break;
            }

            else{

            }
        }
        if(result=='+'){break;}
        else{}
    }
    }

    return result;
}


//The erode function that replaces the image by one in which '#' characters are replaced by '.' characters when it is not surrounded by 4 '#' characters

char **erode(int H, int L, char c[H][L]){

    int i;
    int j;
    char ch='-';

    char **d = malloc (H * sizeof (int *));

    for (i = 0; i < H; i++) {
        d[i] = malloc (L * sizeof (int));
    }

    i=0;

    for (i=0;i<H;i++)
    {
        for (j=0;j<L;j++)
        {
            ch=test(i,j,H,L,c);

            if(ch=='+'){

                d[i][j]='.';

            }
            else{
                d[i][j]=c[i][j];
            }
            ch='-';
        }

    }


for (i= 0; i < H; i++) {
        free(d[i]);
       }
       free(d);

    return d;

}


//here are computed the inputs and outputs
int main()
{   

    int i=0;
    int j=0;


    int N;
    int H;
    int L;
    char o;

    scanf("%d",&N);
    scanf("%d",&H);
    scanf("%d",&L);
    scanf("%c",&o);

    char c[H][L];
    char d[H];
    char ero[H][L];


    while (i<H)
    {
        while (j<L)
        {
            scanf("%c",&c[i][j]);
            j++;
        }
        j=0;
        scanf("%c",&d[i]);
        i++;
    }

    int l;
    int m;
    int n;





    for(l=0;l<N;l++){
    for (i=0;i<H;i++)
    {
        for (j=0;j<L;j++)
        {
        ero[i][j]=erode(H,L,c)[i][j];

        }

    }
        for (m=0;m<H;m++)
        {
            for (n=0;n<L;n++){
                c[m][n]=ero[m][n];
            }

        }

    }


    for (i=0;i<H;i++)
     {
         for (j=0;j<L;j++){
             printf("%c",c[i][j]);
         }
         printf("\n");
     }

}

(The code is far from being optimal because I tried to debugg it and to make something really decomposed)

Does anyone has an idea why I have this message error ?

Best, Newben

share|improve this question
    
char **d = malloc (H * sizeof (int *));? int*? –  Ed S. Jul 24 '12 at 21:52
    
Can you do a little cleanup on your code block there? its messy. –  Wug Jul 24 '12 at 21:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is probably because within your erode function you are using malloc a number of times but never calling free. You actually call erode inside a triple loop from main. This suggests it could be getting called many times but as the allocated memory never gets released it is entirely possible that your memory is getting exhausted which explains the error message. Take more care to release the memory using free when you no longer need it.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, in fact I am really not familiar to dynamic allocation. Could you be more precise please ? –  Newben Jul 24 '12 at 21:59
1  
This is something you need to read about then. Basically malloc allocates memory on the heap. This memory persists until you call free to release it. It is not like a local variable created on the stack. You allocate more and more memory but you never free it so eventually the memory gets entirely used up. Do some googling for dynamic memory allocation - there are many good tutorials on the net. Alternatively, purchase a good text book like Kernighan and Ritchie en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_C_Programming_Language –  mathematician1975 Jul 24 '12 at 22:03
    
Ok thanks a lot. I have edited my code, do you think it is fine now? Btw, I am going to read what you suggested me –  Newben Jul 24 '12 at 22:05
1  
@Newben No because now you are freeing it before you are finished with it (you return d at the end of your function but you have already freed it). I think really you need to do some reading and after you understand dynamic memory have another attempt at this code. Alternatively look at the possibility of not needing so much dynamic allocation. –  mathematician1975 Jul 24 '12 at 22:08
    
OK, I understand well. So I suppressed the dynamic allocation function and it works! Thanks –  Newben Jul 24 '12 at 22:16

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