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I have two tables t1 and t2.

t1 has field position

t2 has fields start & stop

My inner join is as follows:

select  t1.* 
from    t1 inner join t2 on t1.position >= t2.start AND t1.Pos <= t2.stop

Say for example:

  • One of the records in t1.position = 8
  • There are two records in t2 such that t2.start = 1 and t2.end = 15; and t2.start = 5 and t2.end = 10

My query will return two rows as 1 < 8 < 15 and 5 < 8 < 10.

All I want is just the first row?

How can i accomplish this?

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When you say that all you want is the first row, do you always want a specific one? Like, in your example, {start: 1, end: 15}? Or just whichever one comes first? The reason why this matters is that the database could return the records in your example in any order. –  Eric deRiel Jul 24 '12 at 22:09
    
Which DBMS? MySQL, SQL Server, etc.? –  Sir Crispalot Jul 24 '12 at 22:11
    
I am using SQL Server –  user1144596 Jul 24 '12 at 22:37

2 Answers 2

select t1.* from t1
inner join t2 
on t1.position >= t2.start 
AND t1.Pos <= t2.stop
LIMIT 1
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this works in mysql and not in sqlserver –  arunmoezhi Jul 24 '12 at 22:19

You could either perform a distinct on the result set or use an inner query first. If you are dealing with small data sets I would go with the distinct, otherwise use the inner query.

Distinct:

select distinct t1.* from t1 inner join t2 on t1.position >= t2.start AND t1.Pos <= t2.stop

Inner Query:

select t1.*
from t1
inner join
(
    select t1.position
    from t1
    inner join t2 on t1.position >= t2.start
        AND t1.position <= t2.stop
) t2 on t2.position = t1.position
share|improve this answer
    
But then when using the inner query, i dont get to see any fields from t2. How can i accomplish that? –  user1144596 Jul 24 '12 at 22:42

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