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I'm currently writing my first batch file for deploying an asp.net solution. I've been Googling a bit for a general error handling approach and can't find anything really useful.

Basically if any thing goes wrong I want to stop and print out what went wrong.

Can anyone give me any pointers?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You need to read about ERRORLEVEL

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I generally find the conditional command concatenation operators much more convenient than ERRORLEVEL.

yourCommand && (
  echo yourCommand was successful
) || (
  echo yourCommand failed
)

There is one complication you should be aware of. The error branch will fire if the last command in the success branch raises an error.

yourCommand && (
  someCommandThatMayFail
) || (
  echo This will fire if yourCommand or someCommandThatMayFail raises an error
)

The fix is to insert a harmless command that is guaranteed to succeed at the end of the success branch. I like to use (call ), which does nothing except set the ERRORLEVEL to 0. There is a corollary (call) that does nothing except set the ERRORLEVEL to 1.

yourCommand && (
  someCommandThatMayFail
  (call )
) || (
  echo This can only fire if yourCommand raises an error
)

See Foolproof way to check for nonzero (error) return code in windows batch file for examples of the intricacies needed when using ERRORLEVEL to detect errors.

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Would u mind to provide a simple example with copy or del commands, pls? –  Clark Kent Dec 17 '13 at 14:00
    
Much nicer than keeping track of ERRORLEVEL, thanks! –  kaveman Oct 24 at 18:20

Other than ERRORLEVEL, batch files have no error handling. You'd want to look at a more powerful scripting language. I've been moving code to PowerShell.

The ability to easily use .Net assemblies and methods was one of the major reasons I started with PowerShell. The improved error handling was another. The fact that Microsoft is now requiring all of its server programs (Exchange, SQL Server etc) to be PowerShell drivable was pure icing on the cake.

Right now, it looks like any time invested in learning and using PowerShell will be time well spent.

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2  
Yeah, I wish I had done it using power shell, have a felling hacking a batch script is not time well spent.. –  bplus Jul 22 '09 at 11:58
1  
No doubt that PowerShell is a superior language. But ERRORLEVEL is not the only recourse for batch - see my answer –  dbenham Jun 13 '13 at 11:30

A successful ping on your local network can be trapped using ERRORLEVEL.

@ECHO OFF
PING 10.0.0.123
IF ERRORLEVEL 1 GOTO NOT-THERE
ECHO IP ADDRESS EXISTS
PAUSE
EXIT
:NOT-THERE
ECHO IP ADDRESS NOT NOT EXIST
PAUSE
EXIT
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Using ERRORLEVEL when it's available is the easiest option. However, if you're calling an external program to perform some task, and it doesn't return proper codes, you can pipe the output to 'find' and check the errorlevel from that.

c:\mypath\myexe.exe | find "ERROR" >nul2>nul
if not ERRORLEVEL 1 (
echo. Uh oh, something bad happened
exit /b 1
)

Or to give more info about what happened

c:\mypath\myexe.exe 2&1> myexe.log
find "Invalid File" "myexe.log" >nul2>nul && echo.Invalid File error in Myexe.exe && exit /b 1
find "Error 0x12345678" "myexe.log" >nul2>nul && echo.Myexe.exe was unable to contact server x && exit /b 1
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