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I have some JSON that I pull in and read into an object @items:

[
 {
  {
    "id": "A",
    "description": "a_description_one"
    "value": some_alphanumeric_string
  }, 
  {
    "id": "B",
    "description": "b_description_one"
    "value": some_alphanumeric_string
  }, 
  {
    "id": "C",
    "description": "c_description_one"
    "value": some_alphanumeric_string
  }
 }, 
 {
  {
    "id": "C",
    "description": "c_description_3"
    "value": some_alphanumeric_string
  }, 
  {
    "id": "A",
    "description": "a_description_3"
    "value": some_alphanumeric_string
  }, 
  {
    "id": "B",
    "description": "b_description_3"
    "value": some_alphanumeric_string
  }
 }, 
 ...
] 

My goal is to output two tables, as follows, in HTML:

 -----------------------------------------------------
|        A        |        B        |        C        |
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|a_description_one|b_description_one|c_description_one|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|a_description_two|b_description_two|c_description_two|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|a_description_3  |b_description_3  |c_description_3  |
 -----------------------------------------------------

And a second table:

 ----------------------------------------------------
|  C value  | C description  |  Count       | Change |
|----------------------------------------------------|
|some string|it's description|times appeared| change |
 ----------------------------------------------------

While the first table is fairly straightforward, I wasn't able to find a good way to code it because I didn't know the order of the descriptors. As such, I have:

<table> 
  <thead> 
    <tr>
      <th>a</th>
      ...
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody> 
    <% for item in @items %>
      <% for portion in item %> 
        <% if portion[0]["id"] == "A" %> 
           <% a = portion[0] %>
        <% end %>
      ...
      <% end %> 
      <tr> 
        <td><%= a["description"].to_s %></td>
        ...
      </tr> 
    <% end %>
  </tbody>
</table> 

Which seems awful.

As for the second table, all I'm trying to do is look at all the C values, and if there are multiples with the same C value concatenate them. I also want to load yesterdays data, which I can get from the server and have as @items_old, and compare the counts of items with the same values to yesterdays ones. I have no idea where to go with this.

share|improve this question
    
That's not valid JSON, is that first { supposed to be a [ ? –  Alex Wayne Jul 25 '12 at 0:26
    
It isn't right now, but it can be. –  rapidash Jul 25 '12 at 0:30
    
um ok... The fact remains that [{{},{}}] is not valid JSON. You probably mean [[{},{}]] instead. Your version wont parse at all. Dictionaries {} require keys, but you are treating it like an array with no keys. –  Alex Wayne Jul 25 '12 at 0:33
    
I mean, yes, it may be incorrect. However, it doesn't seem to cause any issues at the moment. I've taken note of the issue. –  rapidash Jul 25 '12 at 0:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like the description arrays are out of order, but you need them in order. So just sort the arrays before you iterate through them.

<% for item in @items %>
  <% for portion in item.sort_by { |obj| obj['id'] } %> 
    <tr>
      <td><%= obj["description"].to_s %></td>
      ...
    </tr>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

Alternatively, ruby arrays do have a Array#find method that takes a block and returns an item when the block returns true. So if you want to be real explicit about it you can do:

<% for item in @items %>
  <% for portion in item %> 
    <tr>
      <td><%= item.find { |obj| obj['id'] == 'A' }["description"].to_s %></td>
      <td><%= item.find { |obj| obj['id'] == 'B' }["description"].to_s %></td>
      <td><%= item.find { |obj| obj['id'] == 'C' }["description"].to_s %></td>
    </tr>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

But that starts to get pretty hairy for a view. I would strongly suggest refactoring that logic to some helper methods. The downside here is that you ever have a D in in there you suddenly have a lot of code to change. Simply iterating through sorted arrays you dont have to really care how many are in there, which can be good or bad depending on what you are doing.


Lastly you could transform this data in ruby into a format that is more how you want. Build new arrays and hashes from this data and presented the processed @items object to the view. Or even better wrap all that in a class that would have methods to parse this data and then provide a simple interface to its guts.

If this data is reasonably complex, and used in a lot of different ways, this is likely the most "correct" approach as it encapsulates the data logic far away from the presentation logic.

class Descriptions
  def initialize(json)
    @data = JSON.parse(json)
  end

  def get_description(index, id)
    description_obj = @data[index].find do |obj|
      obj['id'] == id
    end

    description_obj['description'].to_s
  end
end

my_model = Descriptions.new(json)
my_model.get_description(0, 'A')
share|improve this answer
    
Is there no way to find by an id without sorting? While it may take less code, this is as inelegant of a solution as the one I was describing to that problem. –  rapidash Jul 25 '12 at 0:45
    
Well, honestly, there are a lot of ways to do this. But you appear to have unordered data that you want to display in an ordered way. "Sorting" is technical term for just that. Unless you can make the source JSON ordered, you will have to do some kind of sorting eventually. –  Alex Wayne Jul 25 '12 at 0:50
    
It's easy to envision a solution where sorting is completely unnecessary- if there's a way to find an object by the "id" field- and I don't know if there is, the code is just: <% for item in @items %> <td><%= obj.find("id" == "A")["description"].to_s %></td> <% end %> –  rapidash Jul 25 '12 at 0:57
    
I've updated my answer with 2 alternatives. There is literally a million ways to skin this cat. –  Alex Wayne Jul 25 '12 at 1:10
    
Thanks- that helps a lot. –  rapidash Jul 25 '12 at 6:03

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