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I'm trying to write serialization code for a class that looks like this:

public class EventMessage
{
    public Dictionary<string, object> Headers { get; set; }
    public object Body { get; set; }
}

The 'object' type members in this class hold objects from a quite small (basically, restricted to one assembly + basic CLR types) type set. So I figured i could simply list those classes as subtypes of object class like this:

model.Add(typeof(object), false)
    .AddSubType(1, typeof(X))
    .AddSubType(2, typeof(Y))
    ....

This way I don't have to embed type information into the serialized message since the deserialization of the object class itself works much like a switch statement - it checks which one of the tags is present in the message and deserializes to appropriate type. I like this, because then I can freely rename classes and move them around assemblies without breaking things.

This worked great in my tests until I started testing headers, which mostly contain string data. I cannot mark string as a subtype of object since I'm getting this exception:

Data of this type has inbuilt behaviour, and cannot be added to a model in this way: System.String

Is there any way I can achieve this behavior or do I have to embed type information inside messages to serialize such class?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

protobuf-net stores structured data; object is inherently not structured, and it won't let you simply declare subclasses for object, nor will it let you monkey with fundamental types such as string, which has very particular rules for serialization.

This worked great in my tests

If it did, that's a bug; there's no way that should work. At all. It certainly isn't a supported scenario, and won't be guaranteed to do the right thing (it could also significantly break things). I will be changing the code to explicitly cause an exception in this case. I'm adding the following, to be fixed ASAP:

Hmmm.... I though this was an invalid scenario, but my regression tests highlight that there is some "prior art" for this, specifically: Why string interning on serialization in protobuf-net does not work in this example?

(which is why every time I answer a non-trivial protobuf-net question, I add it as a regression test, so I wasn't lying)

I guess I shouldn't exclude it, but please think of the kittens: that is not my recommended way of doing it. I guess I can't kill it now, though. Emphasis, though: I cannot enable this for adding string (etc) as a sub-type. Consider that API message-type only, meaning your custom class/structs.

This way I don't have to embed type information into the serialized message since the deserialization of the object class itself works much like a switch statement

protobuf-net doesn't usually embed type information either ;p Although there is some "dynamic" support that does include type information, but it isn't needed for this scenario.

The supported way to do this without embedding any type information would be to encapsulate the values you want, something like:

[TestFixture]
public class SO11641262
{
    [Test]
    public void Execute()
    {
        var model = TypeModel.Create();
        model.Add(typeof (FooData), true)
            .AddSubType(1, typeof (FooData<string>))
            .AddSubType(2, typeof (FooData<int>))
            .AddSubType(3, typeof (FooData<SomeOtherType>));

        var val = FooData.Create("abc");
        var clone = (FooData)model.DeepClone(val);
        Assert.AreEqual("abc", clone.ValueUntyped);
        Assert.AreEqual(typeof(string), clone.ItemType);

    }

    [ProtoContract]
    public abstract class FooData
    {
        public static FooData<T> Create<T>(T value)
        {
            return new FooData<T> {Value = value};
        }
        public abstract Type ItemType { get; }
        public abstract object ValueUntyped { get; set; }
    }
    [ProtoContract]
    public class FooData<T> : FooData
    {
        [ProtoMember(1)]
        public T Value { get; set; }

        public override Type ItemType
        {
            get { return typeof (T); }
        }
        public override object ValueUntyped
        {
            get { return Value; }
            set { Value = (T) value; }
        }
    }
    [ProtoContract]
    public class SomeOtherType {}
}
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The problem with your suggested approach is that I generally have no way to change what headers are included without hacking around source code of other people. I also do not understand how my approach to this is wrong or harmful in any way - I'm serializing a very strict set of events and explicitly defining what structure an object can have in serialization context. So effectively object is structured data here. But I respect your position and I guess I'll have to embed type information to solve my problem. –  Vytautas Mackonis Jul 25 '12 at 10:25
    
Also, looking back at your suggested approach, you're redefining object class here (FooData is inherently the same thing as object, FooData<string> - same as string, etc), it just happens to be elsewhere in the class hierarchy. If object is not structured then how is FooData (non-generic version) structured? –  Vytautas Mackonis Jul 25 '12 at 11:31
    
@VytautasMackonis everything is object, yet we don't really want to treat that as the root of the global object model. FooData / FooData<T> defines a self-contained part of the type-system, which can't be confused with unrelated types. –  Marc Gravell Jul 25 '12 at 11:37
    
@VytautasMackonis how did you get to "I'll have to embed type information"? I'm not seeing any part of your question that would conclude with that... genuinely interested, as that may be key to the question. Can you perhaps also clarify what you mean by "what headers are included"? Again, happy to try to help get to the bottom of this, but I need to fully understand the context. –  Marc Gravell Jul 25 '12 at 11:39
    
The EventMessage class is part of JOliver Event store project. The headers are filled by my code and JOliver Common domain project code. Changing the structure of this class to employ FooData<T> kind of data model would be a major undertaking. I technically could avoid strings (or primitive types) in headers and still use the subclasses of objects but this does not look a natural thing to do. So now I'd have to choose between changing EventStore code, changing Common domain code or embedding type information to be able to serialize my events. The latter seems the least hacky way. –  Vytautas Mackonis Jul 25 '12 at 11:50

Couldn't you add a "Message" or similar class that just encapsulated your String that you are trying to embed

class Message
{
  [ProtoMember(1)]
  string Data {get;set;}
}
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Hm.. I think it doesn't matter if it's CLR primitive type, that inherits from object, or some custom type. If it's registered as inherited type, then it should work in any way. As far as I understand generally it serializes in such structure

object
{
  A: {..., AA: {}}
  B: {..., BB: {}}
}

class A{ ... } 
class A: AA { ...}

class B {...}
class BB : B {...}

It shouldn't affect anything it it add additional inheritance like

object
{
  A: {..., AA: {}}
  B: {..., BB: {}}
  String: 'asdf'
}

Because you are not changing string serialization, just adding String as inherited object. Same issue would be if I would want to have int or any other primtive type

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