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the counter isn't working

mypost is the input value

$("#post").click(function() {
    var cont = 0;
    value = $("#mypost").val()
    $("#1").append(value);
    $("#mypost").val('');
    var like = $('<button>like</button>', {
        click: function() {
            cont++;
            $('#1').append(cont);
        }
    });
    $('#1').append(like);
    $('#1').append('</br>');
});​
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2  
Instead of saying "isn't working", it is more helpful to tell us what it does and what you expect it to do. –  Dennis Jul 25 '12 at 1:02
1  
I don't think you can have IDs that begin with numbers. –  sachleen Jul 25 '12 at 1:03
2  
@sachleen - in HTML5 you can. –  j08691 Jul 25 '12 at 1:04
1  
jsfiddle.net/um3MU here is the fiddle –  lean Jul 25 '12 at 1:06
1  
You're just using the API wrong, but in your defense, jQuery's methods/functions are sometimes overloaded in confusing ways. To pass the second argument, you need to create the element like $("<button>", your_props), and add text: "like", to the props. The jQuery function is overloaded with far too much behavior, including these two different ways of creating elements. –  squint Jul 25 '12 at 1:30

2 Answers 2

The event listener isn't properly hooked up when adding it as a property in the $("<tag />") constructor. (Despite the documentation for $() mentioning events in the props.. I believe it's related to the element not being hooked up to the DOM; wild guess.)

Seems to work when adding it on the following line with .click(function).

var like = $('<button>like</button>')
    .click(function() {
        cont++;
        $('#1').append(cont);
    });

Edit: missed the fact that #mypost was read using .val(). Updated the jsfiddle to use an <input />.

http://jsfiddle.net/joelpurra/bJa29/

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Not sure if this will help but IDs must begin with a letter.

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

See here (http://www.w3.org - Basic HTML data types) for more information.

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2  
Not true. This restriction is removed in HTML5 and is not enforced by any browser. –  Dennis Jul 25 '12 at 1:03
    
jQuery works without them being a letter. Also, removed in HTML5 –  ahren Jul 25 '12 at 1:03

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