Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Does anyone know of a way to get around declaring var self = this when using JavaScript in an OO fashion? I see it quite often and was curious if its just something you have to do, or if there really is a way (perhaps a class library?) that lets you get around it? I do realize why it is necessary (this has function scope). But you never know what clever ways may be out there..

For example, I usually code my "classes" like this in JS:

function MyClass() {

}

MyClass.prototype = {

    firstFunction: function() {

        var self = this;

        $.ajax({
            ...
            success: function() {
                self.someFunctionCall();

            }
        });
    },

    secondFunction: function() {

        var self = this;

        window.setTimeout(function() {
            self.someOtherFunction();
        }, 1000);
    }

};
share|improve this question
1  
I just want to point out that you should really set the constructor property of the prototype to point back to MyClass since you set it to another object. Just append the following line to your code: MyClass.prototype.constructor = MyClass;. – Aadit M Shah Jul 25 '12 at 1:47
up vote 6 down vote accepted

In your first function you can do this...

$.ajax({
    context: this,
    success: function() {
        this.someFunctionCall();

    }
});

In the second one, you can do this, though you'll need to shim .bind() in older browsers...

window.setTimeout(function() {
    this.someOtherFunction();
}.bind(this), 1000);

With jQuery, you could also do this...

window.setTimeout($.proxy(function() {
    this.someOtherFunction();
}, this), 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
using this inside of an anonymous function will not give you a reference to MyClass – Hunter McMillen Jul 25 '12 at 1:41
5  
@HunterMcMillen: In all my solutions, this will be a reference to MyClass. – squint Jul 25 '12 at 1:43
    
Would you mind explaining how it works to me? I am missing something – Hunter McMillen Jul 25 '12 at 1:45
    
@HunterMcMillen: The $.ajax one sets the this value of the callback by setting the context: property. The second one uses Function.prototype.bind to permanently bind the this value to the function, and the third one uses $.proxy, which is sort of like a light version of Function.prototype.bind. – squint Jul 25 '12 at 1:47
    
Thank you, that was really informative; sorry for doubting :) – Hunter McMillen Jul 25 '12 at 1:48

No, you need to do this if you want to refer to this in a different context (such as a callback) since otherwise it will be reassigned to another object such as window.

By the way, self is a python convention - in JavaScript people generally use the convention that = this. But it is just a matter of personal taste.

share|improve this answer
    
I've seen self, that, and obj used in js. – Josh Noe Jul 25 '12 at 1:40
2  
YMMV. I think I've seen self a dozen times in Javascript for every that. – Malvolio Jul 25 '12 at 1:42
1  
I've seen a lot of that, but I find it semantically wrong. this and that, as words, are basically opposites. But we want them to refer to the same object. – Imp Jul 25 '12 at 1:45
3  
@Imp: Think of it this way: "this" and "that" are often used together in English in opposition where "this" refers to the closer item; "that" refers to the more remote one. Or, alternately, "this" is mine, whereas "that" is someone else's/not mine. When you set that=this, you're preparing to pass the current execution context's owner object to another execution context--one in which this points to a different object, and so the object referenced by that is indeed the other, more remote item. – Lèse majesté Jul 25 '12 at 2:15
2  
I've also seen more selfs than thats, and I think it's clearer, but clearer still is something altogether more descriptive, such as, in the original example, var myClass = this;. – Scott Sauyet Jul 25 '12 at 2:32

ES5 added the standard method called bind which allows you to bind the this of a function as well as the first n number of parameters. In the example above, you can avoid using self by calling bind.

$.ajax({ 
    ... 
    success: function() { 
        this.someFunctionCall(); 
    }.bind(this); 
}); 

For non-ES5 browsers you can use a shim for it such as the one found here: https://github.com/kriskowal/es5-shim

As an asside, I would avoid using self in your coding pattern because self is defined as a global variable that is equal to window which is the global scope. In other words, if you accidentally forget to define self you will silently get the global scope as the value instead of an exception. If you use that instead, you will get an exception (unless someone above you defined it).

share|improve this answer

Some javascript frameworks have their own event handling mechanisms that allow you to set context for the handler function. This way, instead of using self = this, you can simply specify this as the context.

Other possibility that comes to my mind is to pass the context in somewhere in global scope. Like

function MyClass() {
    MyClass.instances.push(this);
}

MyClass.instances = new Array();
MyClass.getInstanceBySomeRelevantParameter = function(param) {
     for (var i = 0; i < MyClass.instances.length; i++)
         if (condition(param))
             return MyClass.instances[i];
}

...

success: function(event) {
    MyClass.getInstanceBySomeRelevantParameter(event).someFunctionCall();
}
share|improve this answer

You may always bind your methods to this and then use it as follows:

function MyClass() {

}

MyClass.prototype = {

    firstFunction: function() {

        var funct = someFunctionCall.bind(this);

        $.ajax({
            ...
            success: function() {
                funct();

            }
        });
    },

    secondFunction: function() {

        var funct = someOtherFunction.bind(this);

        window.setTimeout(function() {
            funct();
        }, 1000);
    }

};

For properties just assign them to another variable.

share|improve this answer

I fooled around on JSFiddle, and came up with the below. It does assume that you are using a top level namespace. This makes it so you only need to declare self once (at the bottom). I wrapped the class in an anonymous function so self wouldn't have a global scope. The fiddle is: http://jsfiddle.net/bdicasa/yu4vs/

var App = {};
(function() {
    App.MyClass = function() { }

    App.MyClass.prototype = {

        firstFunction: function() {

            console.log('in first function');
            console.log(self === this); // true
        },

        secondFunction: function() {


            window.setTimeout(function() {
                self.firstFunction();
                console.log(self === this); // false
            }, 100);
        }

    };
    var self = App.MyClass.prototype;
})();

var myClass = new App.MyClass();
myClass.secondFunction();
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't set the self to the element invoking the function. In other words, self inside your methods will be App.MyClass.prototype, not the myClass instance. If you define the var that = this; in the methods, then do console.log(that === self); in the setTimeout callback, you'll see that it returns false. – squint Jul 25 '12 at 2:22
    
Hmm. Good catch, I'm out of ideas. – Brian DiCasa Jul 25 '12 at 2:28
    
It's just one of those unfortunate aspects of JavaScript. There's no implicit transfer of calling context to a nested function. So all you can do is use one of the workarounds. – squint Jul 25 '12 at 2:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.