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Here is a common practice in JavaScript:

(function($) {
    ...code...
})(jQuery);

I understand the wrapper function (it prevents pollution of the global namespace), but many libraries (like jQuery, Underscore, etc.) already define short names ($ and _, respectively) at global scope for me to use. I wonder what the advantage to this approach is. Just to rename jQuery to something shorter? Prevent me from overwriting $? Make it easier to swap in another library later? I guess none of these seem really convincing to me.

Furthermore, I have also seen this:

(function(_) {
    ...code...
})(_);

Nothing is even renamed here. I have even seen:

(function(global) {
    ...code...
})(this); // or window, perhaps

What is wrong with just using window directly?

So here's what I'm asking:

  • Does this practice have a name?
  • What are the advantages to this practice?
  • Should I always pass in libraries I'm using rather than use them directly?
  • Should I pass in this or window as a reference to global scope?
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Why don't the reasons you listed seem convincing? How much convincing would you really require? It's just a simple function invocation, requiring little cost. –  squint Jul 25 '12 at 2:14
    
They don't seem really convincing because none of those reasons are relevant to my small projects. Rename to something shorter? There is already $. Prevent me from overwriting $? Not something I ever do anyway. Swap in another library later? Drop-in replacement libraries often use the same names to save programmers this trouble in the first place. ...All that said, from a defensive coding perspective, perhaps there are advantages. –  Calvin Jul 25 '12 at 2:46
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does this practice have a name?

The syntax is referred to as a self-executing anonymous function. I'm not aware of any special name for passing global objects to the function.

What are the advantages to this practice?

  • As you've noted, var scoping variables within the function will help de-clutter the global namepace.
  • The jQuery example is typically used in plugins so that the plugin can make use of $ while remaining compatible with $.noConflict() (docs)

    (function($) {
        ...code...
    })(jQuery);
    
  • In general, passing global or reserved objects (like window, document) as parameters can help reduce the size of your script after minification:

    (function(window, document) {
        // A JS minifier can now minify the all occurrences of `window` and
        // `document` within this function.
    })(window, document); 
    

Should I always pass in libraries I'm using rather than use them directly?
Should I pass in this or window as a reference to global scope?

Only if minification or conflicting library variable names are a concern.

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What are the advantages to this practice?

If the variable ('_', '$', etc) is later overwritten by some other code, your code will continue to work as expected. It will use the value passed in when the wrapper function was invoked.

Should I always pass in libraries I'm using rather than use them directly?

No, but if you have any concerns about the above, it's probably a good practice. Also, if you look up AMD loaders such as Require.js, you will find this a familiar technique, as they do something similar to define the requirements for your module.

Should I pass in this or window as a reference to global scope?

this has the advantage that the code will run where ever there is a global scope. For instance, if you code might possibly run on a Node.js server, there is no window.

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