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Employee can work in many departments, and each department can have many employees. Hence a relation table is needed

TABLES:
EMP(eid,ename,eage,esalary)
Works(eid,did,pct_time)
Dept(did,dname,budget, managerid)

Find all the employees that work in both software and hardware:

SELECT e.ename FROM EMP e, Works w, Dept d 
WHERE e.eid = w.eid AND w.did = d.did AND d.did = 
(SELECT did FROM dept WHERE dname = 'Hardware' OR 'Software')  

As Per Jon:

SELECT e.ename FROM EMP e OR Works w OR Dept d 
WHERE e.eid = w.eid AND w.did = d.did AND d.did = 
(SELECT did FROM dept WHERE dname = 'Hardware' OR 'Software')

And I just can't figure out how to make sure there are two entries in Works for both hardware and software under the same eid.

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Your FROM Emp e OR Works w OR Dept d syntax is a novel innovation on the standard SQL notations. I fear that the DBMS you're using may take exception to the syntax and reject your SQL statement. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 25 '12 at 3:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
select e.name
  from emp e, works h_w, dept h_d, works s_w, dept s_d
 where e.eid = h_w.eid
   and e.eid = s_w.eid
   and h_w.did = h_d.did
   and h_d.dname = 'Hardware'
   and s_w.did = s_d.did
   and s_d.dname = 'Software'
share|improve this answer
    
wow that is great info, i had no idea you could alias the same table with different names. –  Special--k Jul 25 '12 at 3:07
    
Generally, you should use the 'modern' (meaning post-1992) SQL standard JOIN notation rather than the 'ancient' (meaning pre-1992) comma-separated list of table names in the FROM clause. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 25 '12 at 3:23
    
like i did above in my edit? –  Special--k Jul 25 '12 at 3:32
    
@JonathanLeffler it's not surprising though with one of the tags as "homework". Many schools still teach SQL using the old join syntax. –  Zane Bien Jul 25 '12 at 3:34

Here are the steps on how you can tackle the problem:

  • First, get all rows in the works table where the department is EITHER hardware or software
  • Then, for any employee, if two rows exist, that means he/she works for BOTH departments.
  • For any employee, if less than two rows exist, that means he/she only works for one of the two, or none at all.
  • We need to retrieve the employees that have exactly two rows.

So what we can first do is select from the works table, join it against the dept table, and filter out any departments that are not hardware or software:

SELECT a.*
FROM works a
INNER JOIN dept b ON a.did = b.did
WHERE b.dname IN ('Hardware','Software')

Then what we want to do is group by each employee, which will give us access to aggregate information such as the count of rows per employee, or sum/max/min/avg/etc. of other columns. We must work with count:

SELECT a.eid
FROM works a
INNER JOIN dept b ON a.did = b.did
WHERE b.dname IN ('Hardware','Software')
GROUP BY a.eid
HAVING COUNT(1) = 2

This gives us only the eids that have exactly two rows (i.e. works for BOTH software AND hardware departments).

But the eids aren't enough. We want the entire information about the employee, so we must wrap that entire query and join it against the employees table to get the rest of their information:

SELECT a.*
FROM emp a
INNER JOIN 
(
    SELECT a.eid
    FROM works a
    INNER JOIN dept b ON a.did = b.did
    WHERE b.dname IN ('Hardware','Software')
    GROUP BY a.eid
    HAVING COUNT(1) = 2
) b ON a.eid = b.eid

And there you have it: employees who work in both software AND hardware departments. You can execute each of the queries above individually to see the intermediate steps on how we arrive at our final solution.

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It is clear now that i see it, but i don't think i would have come up with that on my own. Although, as i progress through this, i might need some of these techniques for other questions. Thanks a lot. –  Special--k Jul 25 '12 at 3:20

Here's an alternative formulation of the query:

SELECT e.*
  FROM emp AS e
  JOIN (SELECT w.eid
          FROM works AS w JOIN dept AS d
            ON d.did = w.did AND d.dname = 'Software') AS s
    ON s.eid = e.eid
  JOIN (SELECT w.eid
          FROM works AS w JOIN dept AS d
            ON d.did = w.did AND d.dname = 'Hardware') AS h
    ON h.eid = e.eid

This has two symmetric sub-queries, one generating the employee IDs for the Software department, one generating employee IDs for the Hardware department. The selected employees are those whose ID is listed in both departments (because they're all inner joins).

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the alias s and h give you handles to the results of the SELECT queries? I find this one the hardest to follow. –  Special--k Jul 25 '12 at 3:37
    
The AS s effectively names the result of the query it is attached to as s (as if it was a table, or view), and similarly with AS h and its query. If you've not been taught the JOIN notations, then this could well be harder, but (IMNSHO) shame on the school for not teaching you the JOIN notations. There are a large number of reasons why they're better than the old style notation. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 25 '12 at 3:48

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