Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a view that pulls around 1mil of records; and it takes around 15 minutes for temp table to be created. Nevertheless, only 1 of my CPU cores shows load, the other 7cores are available. How can I use all cores for this process?

create table feed_03_tmp as SELECT *  FROM feed_03;
share|improve this question
    
Are you CPU bound or IO bound? And did you optimize you configuration parameters for your workload? – Frank Heikens Jul 25 '12 at 4:40
    
Depending on the view and the query plan you can try to give that client more RAM to work with: set work_mem to '1GB'. – A.H. Jul 25 '12 at 10:32
    
Setting work_mem very high does help sometimes, but is generally not a good advice. It all depends on the view-definition: if a merge-join is possible, that should be preferred (IMHO), especially for large result-sets. – wildplasser Jul 25 '12 at 14:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

PostgreSQL backends are single threaded and there is one backend per client so a single client can only use a single core. However for such a simple query I am pretty sure you are IO bound. If you are IO-bound the one core doing the work will be below 100% load if it is constantly at 100% you are CPU bound.

You could use more then one core by opening multiple connections and let each copy a selection of rows but as I said it is probably not going to help. Note that each connection will be in it's own transaction.

To improve IO you may benefit from storing your temp tables on a seperate drive. To do this create a tablespace on a second drive and add a TABLESPACE clause to your create table statement.

CREATE TABLE feed_03_tmp 
  TABLESPACE my_temp_tablespace
  AS SELECT *  FROM feed_03;

BTW: the postgresql developers are experimenting with introducing multithreading but it probably will take sometime for it to get widely used and make it into a release.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.