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I'm following the Page Object pattern suggested by Selenium, but how would I create a more specialized WebElement for a page. Specifically, we have tables on our pages and I have written some helper functions to get specific rows of a table, return the contents of a table, etc...

Currently, here is a snippet of a page object I created that has a table:

public class PermissionsPage  {

@FindBy(id = "studyPermissionsTable")
private WebElement permissionTable;

@FindBy(id = "studyPermissionAddPermission")
private WebElement addPermissionButton; 
... }

So what I'd like to do is have that permissionsTable to be a more customized WebElement that has some of those methods I mentioned earlier

for example:

     public class TableWebElement extends WebElement {
    WebElement table;
    //a WebDriver needs to come into play here too I think

    public List<Map<String, String>> getTableData() {
        //code to do this
    }

     public int getTableSize() {
        //code to do this
     }

     public WebElement getElementFromTable(String id) {
      //code to do this
     }
}

I hope that this makes sense what I'm trying to explain. I guess what I'm looking for is a way to have this custom WebElement to do some additional stuff that's table-specific. Add this custom element to a Page and take advantage of the way Selenium wires the webelements to the page based on the annotations.
Is this possible? And if so, does anyone know how this can be done. Thanks in advance.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Side note: WebDriver is not class, its interface which means your class would look more like this:

public class TableWebElement implements WebElement {

But in that case you must implement all the methods which are in WebDriver. And its kinda overkill.

Here is way how I do this - I got rid completely of proposed PageObjects as proposed by selenium and "reinvented the wheel" by having my own classes. I have one class for the whole application:

public class WebUI{
  private WebDriver driver;    
  private WebElement permissionTable;   

   public WebUI(){
      driver = new firefoxDriver();
   }

  public WebDriver getDriver(){
     return driver;
  }

  public WebElement getPermissionTable(){
     return permissionTable;
  }

  public TableWebElement getTable(){
     permissionTable = driver.findElement(By.id("studyPermissionsTable"));
     return new TableWebElement(this);
  }
}

And then I have my helper classes

public class TableWebElement{
  private WebUI webUI;

 public TableWebElement(WebUI wUI){
    this.webUI = wUI;
 }

 public int getTableSize() {
    // because I dont know exactly what are you trying to achieve just few hints
    // this is how you get to the WebDriver:
    WebElement element = webUI.getDriver().findElement(By.id("foo"));

    //this is how you get to already found table:
    WebElement myTable = webUI.getPermissionTable();

 }

}

Sample of test:

 @Test
 public void testTableSize(){
    WebUI web = new WebUI();
    TableWebElement myTable = web.getTable();
    Assert.assertEquals(myTable.getSize(), 25);
 }
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I like this idea, I"ll try it out and let you know how it goes. –  pipplupp Jul 26 '12 at 16:45
    
btw, I don' know who noted that this answer is not useful. I'm curious why someone voted that way. –  pipplupp Jul 26 '12 at 19:16
    
At least you like the idea :) –  Pavel Janicek Jul 27 '12 at 9:48

I created an interface that combines all of the WebDriver interfaces:

public interface Element extends WebElement, WrapsElement, Locatable {}

It's just there to wrap up all of the things WebElements can do when wrapping an element.

Then an implementation:

public class ElementImpl implements Element {

    private final WebElement element;

    public ElementImpl(final WebElement element) {
        this.element = element;
    }

    @Override
    public void click() {
        element.click();
    }

    @Override
    public void sendKeys(CharSequence... keysToSend) {
        element.sendKeys(keysToSend);
    }

    // And so on, delegates all the way down...

}

Then, for example a check box:

public class CheckBox extends ElementImpl {

    public CheckBox(WebElement element) {
        super(element);
    }

    public void toggle() {
        getWrappedElement().click();
    }

    public void check() {
        if (!isChecked()) {
            toggle();
        }
    }

    public void uncheck() {
        if (isChecked()) {
            toggle();
        }
    }

    public boolean isChecked() {
        return getWrappedElement().isSelected();
    }
}

When using it in my script:

CheckBox cb = new CheckBox(element);
cb.uncheck();

I've also come up with a way of wrapping the Element classes. You have to create a few factories to replace the built-in PageFactory, but it is doable, and it lends a lot of flexibility.

I've documented this process over on my site:

I've also got a project called selophane that was inspired by this and other questions: selophane

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As a follow up to this, this is what I ended up doing (in case anyone else has this same issue). Below is a snippet of the class I created as a wrapper to a WebElement:

public class CustomTable {

private WebDriver driver;
private WebElement tableWebElement;

public CustomTable(WebElement table, WebDriver driver) {
    this.driver = driver;
    tableWebElement = table;
}

public WebElement getTableWebElement() {
    return tableWebElement;
}

public List<WebElement> getTableRows() {
    String id = tableWebElement.getAttribute("id");
    return driver.findElements(By.xpath("//*[@id='" + id + "']/tbody/tr"));
}

public List<WebElement> getTableHeader() {
    String id = tableWebElement.getAttribute("id");
    return tableWebElement.findElements(By.xpath("//*[@id='" + id + "']/thead/tr/th"));
}   
.... more utility functions here
}

And then I use this in any Pages that create by referencing it like so:

public class TestPage {

@FindBy(id = "testTable")
private WebElement myTestTable;

/**
 * @return the myTestTable
 */
public CustomTable getBrowserTable() {
    return new CustomTable(myTestTable, getDriver());
}

The only thing that I don't like is that when the page wants to get the table, it creates a "new" table. I did this to avoid StaleReferenceExeptions which happens when the data in the table is updated (i.e. cell updated, row added, row removed). If anyone has any suggestions on how I can avoid creating a new instance every time it's requested, but rather returns the updated WebElement that would be great!

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Why bother extending WebElement? Are you trying to actually develop the Selenium package? Then if you are it wouldn't make sense to extend that method unless your additions can be applicable to every single web element that you use, not just the ones that are specific to your table

Why not just do something like:

public class PermissionsPage extends TableWebElement{

...permissions stuff...

}

import WebElement

public class TableWebElement{

...custom web elements pertaining to my page...

}

I don't know if that answers your question, but it seemed to me it was more a class architecture question more than anything else.

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I would create what I call a "SubPageObject" which represents a PageObject on a PageObject...

The advantage is that you can create custom made methods for it and you can initialize only WebElements you really need within this SubPageObject.

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Why not make a web element wrapper? like this?

class WEBElment
{

public IWebElement Element;

public WEBElement(/*send whatever you decide, a webelement, a by element, a locator whatever*/)

{

Element = /*make the element from what you sent your self*/

}


public bool IsDisplayed()

{

return Element.Displayed;

}

} // end of class here

but you can make your class more complicated than this. just a concept

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