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Can a local variable's memory be accessed outside its scope?
Scope vs life of variable in C

int *p;

void foo()
{
    int i = 5;
    p = &i;
}

void foo1()
{
    printf("%d\n", *p);
}

int main()
{
   foo();
   foo1();
   return 0;
}

Output: 5 (foo1() print the value of i)

Note: I am running this program on Linux

According my knowledge, the scope of local automic variables are limited to the life of block/function.

  1. In what memory segment this variable i in foo() gets store? or where does all local variables of functions get stores?
  2. How can I access this from another function?
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marked as duplicate by ugoren, Jens Gustedt, Will Ness, Jonathan Leffler, chris Jul 25 '12 at 6:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
This has been asked very often already, please search the site before posting. Also your use the buttons that you find on the top of the edit pane to structure your question, as you can find it now after chris' edit. Please invest at least a little bit of work before asking. –  Jens Gustedt Jul 25 '12 at 6:30
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2 Answers

You're invoking undefined behaviour when accessing *p in foo1(). If you added a function like this:

void do_very_little(void)
{
    char buffer[] = "abcdef";
    puts(buffer);
}

and call it between calling foo() and foo1(), you probably get a different output. That's not guaranteed; one of the interesting things about undefined behaviour is that anything can happen and you've no grounds for complaint.

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1- In that case, every function has a pile segment, then local variables are storage there, that " the scope of local automic variables are limited to the life of block/function. " is because, when it starts running a function, compiler create its pile, do stuff, functions ends and then destroy that pile.

2- if you want access a variable from another functions, reserve variable space with "malloc", pass it to a function and do stuff with it.

int *p = malloc(sizeof(int))

void foo(p)
{

    *p = 5;
}

void foo1()
{
    printf("%d\n", *p);
}

int main()
{
   foo(p);
   foo1();
   return 0;
}
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2  
Picking nits: in C, you cannot call a function to initialize a global variable like p (though you can in C++). Also, the term 'pile' is non-standard in English. You might be thinking of 'heap', which is where dynamically allocated variables (via malloc() et al) are located. Normally, though, local variables are allocated on the 'stack', rather than on the 'heap'. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 25 '12 at 14:35
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