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Hey guys i have written a script that reads href tag of a webpage and fetches the links on that webpage and writes them to a text file. Now i have a text file containing links such as these for example:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/default.stm
http://news.bbc.co.uk/weather/
http://news.bbc.co.uk/weather/forecast/8?area=London
http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/fds/hi/business/market_data/overview/default.stm
http://purl.org/dc/terms/
http://static.bbci.co.uk/bbcdotcom/0.3.131/style/3pt_ads.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/frameworks/barlesque/2.8.7/desktop/3.5/style/main.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/frameworks/pulsesurvey/0.7.0/style/pulse.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/wwhomepage-3.5/1.0.48/css/bundles/ie6.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/wwhomepage-3.5/1.0.48/css/bundles/ie7.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/wwhomepage-3.5/1.0.48/css/bundles/ie8.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/wwhomepage-3.5/1.0.48/css/bundles/main.css
http://static.bbci.co.uk/wwhomepage-3.5/1.0.48/img/iphone.png
http://www.bbcamerica.com/
http://www.bbc.com/future
http://www.bbc.com/future/
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120719-how-to-land-on-mars
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120719-road-opens-for-connected-cars
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120724-in-search-of-aliens
http://www.bbc.com/news/

I would like to be able to filter them such that i return something like:

http://www.bbc.com : 6
http://static.bbci.co.uk: 15

The values on the the side indicate the number of times the domain appears in the file. How can i be able to achieve this in bash considering i would have a loop going through the file. I am a newbie to bash shell scripting ?

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1  
whathaveyoutried.com –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 25 '12 at 7:10

2 Answers 2

Just like this

egrep -o '^http://[^/]+' domain.txt | sort | uniq -c

Output of this on your example data:

3 http://news.bbc.co.uk/
1 http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/
1 http://purl.org/
8 http://static.bbci.co.uk/
6 http://www.bbc.com/
1 http://www.bbcamerica.com/

This solution works even if your line is made up of a simple url without a trailing slash, so

http://www.bbc.com/news
http://www.bbc.com/
http://www.bbc.com

will all be in the same group.

If you want to allow https, then you can write:

egrep -o '^https?://[^/]+' domain.txt | sort | uniq -c

If other protocols are possible, such as ftp, mailto, etc. you can even be very loose and write:

egrep -o '^[^:]+://[^/]+' domain.txt | sort | uniq -c
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1  
Where does http://en.wikipedia.org/come from? ;) –  user647772 Jul 25 '12 at 7:15
1  
+1 Heh, good catch! I pasted the OP's code into an text editor window that had a Wikipedia url as the sole line. The first bbc.co.uk line started at the end of that line, so I ended up with only 2 bbc.co.uk's. Cleaned it up. –  Ray Toal Jul 25 '12 at 7:18
    
This is incredible... thanks alot –  roykasa Jul 25 '12 at 7:19
    
I like the use of -o, that's new to me. –  user647772 Jul 25 '12 at 7:19
    
What happens if there's a base domain without a slash, e.g. http://exmaple.com? It would be excluded. –  Sorpigal Jul 25 '12 at 11:30
$ cut -d/ -f-3 urls.txt | sort | uniq -c                  
3 http://news.bbc.co.uk
1 http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk
1 http://purl.org
8 http://static.bbci.co.uk
1 http://www.bbcamerica.com
6 http://www.bbc.com
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome thanks alot... Just what i needed –  roykasa Jul 25 '12 at 7:18
    
+1 cut is cleaner than my regex. –  Ray Toal Jul 25 '12 at 7:20
    
Wrong output format. Here's the sed to fix it: | sed -e 's/ *\([0-9]*\) \(.*\)/\2: \1/' –  Sorpigal Jul 25 '12 at 11:35
    
Actually the OP said "return something like" so the answer is good :) but the comment and your solution is useful. –  Ray Toal Jul 25 '12 at 14:42

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