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I have a class Foo with a number of public and private methods. One of those methods is getting rather large, and I would like to fork it off into a separate class specifically for that purpose. Something like this:

<?php

class Foo
{
  //  ...

  public function doX( $a, $b )
  {
    $x = new FooXDoer;
    $x->foo = $this;
    return $x->run( $a, $b );
  }

  //  ...
}

class FooXDoer
{
  public $foo;

  public function run( $a, $b )
  {
    // ...
  }

  // ...
}

FooXDoer has access to Foo's public methods and properties through $this->foo.

How can I give FooXDoer access to Foo's private methods and properties, without making them public to the rest of the code which already uses Foo?

Should I create a separate class FooPrivate which has the private methods as public, and which Foo wraps, and then have FooXDoer reference that? What should FooPrivate be called?

Or is my approach completely wrong? How do you solve this problem in general?

share|improve this question
1  
It's pretty unclear (to me at least) what you're trying to do here. Could you use real-life examples? –  Sherlock Jul 25 '12 at 7:37
    
If you want to seperate funtionality between classes make sure that the classes have their information. If function X relies on the data of object y and does manipulations on it I would suggest you keep the functionality in object y. –  bkwint Jul 25 '12 at 7:44
    
I'd say make 'em public, but put in comments to warn off other coders. While you can probably build something that will programatically prevent access by other classes, it's not going to be pretty. –  Rob Agar Jul 25 '12 at 8:31
    
if you want to access private properties, you can pass them to the constructor of FooXDoe() . You can not do this for private methods however. –  Nick Jun 9 '14 at 20:52

2 Answers 2

Looks like traits solve your problem best in case you use PHP >= 5.4.

If not, I thought of the following solution:

class A {
    private static $allowedClasses = array('B');
    private $a = 1;

    public function __get($property) {
        $caller = debug_backtrace(false);
        if(!isset($caller[1]))
            throw new Exception('Bla bla');
        if(!in_array($caller[1]['class'], self::$allowedClasses))
            throw new Exception('Bla bla');
        return $this->$property;
    }

    public function testB() {
        $b = new B();
        $b->instA = $this;
        echo $b->getA();
    }

}

class B {
    public $instA;
    public function getA() {
        return $this->instA->a;
    }
}

class C {
    public function getA() {
        $instA = new A();
        return $instA->a;
    }
}

$a = new A();
$a->testB(); // Works ok;
$c = new C();
$c->getA(); // Throws exception here;

This code is definitely not a best practice :) But since it is possible I put it here.

share|improve this answer
    
A correct, however hideous, solution to the problem. Could you briefly describe how traits could resolve this? –  Jesse Jul 25 '12 at 8:28
1  
Just plain crazy. –  Alex Jul 25 '12 at 8:34
1  
Traits have access to methods and properties of the class they're used in. So you can implement your large function in a trait and use all properties of your Foo class. –  Eugene Jul 25 '12 at 8:43
    
sure not best practice, and nothing for productive code, but somehow I like this...very creative use of language features –  cypherabe Jul 25 '12 at 8:51
    
It like an access control for class properties. It's crazy but I like it! –  PiTheNumber Jul 25 '12 at 9:07

PHP has no friend class concept, from what I've read I wouldn't say it's a bad decision by the php designers...

IMHO, there is no general strategy, as the problem or question is too broad: there are too many factors to consider:

  • how many private properties and methods of Foo are needed in run()?
  • from an abstraction point of view: how closely is run() entangeled in Foo? Does it really "deserve" to be in an independent class?
  • will you ever use FooXDoer outside of Foo?

Two ideas for solutions:

hand over the needed data from foo to fooDoer, either value for value or by implementing a compileRunData() on Foo that returns an array or an object

public function doX( $a, $b )
{
 $x = new FooXDoer;
 $workEnvironment = $this->compileRunData();
 $x->setEnvironment( $workEnvironment );
 $x->foo = $this;
 return $x->run( $a, $b );
}

or use inheritance, especially the concept of protected properties:

abstract class FooAbstract
{
 protected $_basicVar1;
 protected function basicMethod1(/*...*/) {
  //...
 }
 // ...
}

abstract class FooRunner extends FooAbstract
{
 protected $_runVar1;

 protected function runMethod1(/*...*/) {
  //...
 }

 public function run($a, $b) {
  // ...
 }
}

public class Domain_Model_Foo extends FooRunner 
{

}

edit: hey, SO didn't show me there was already an answer. Yea, thought about traits, too, but haven't used them until now so can't really comment on them

share|improve this answer
    
I think inheritance would be the best solution to this problem. –  PiTheNumber Jul 25 '12 at 9:09

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