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I am doing a project with an arduino to make a bell ring, and when I first tried, it worked how I wanted it to (wait(Serial.read())), but now I need to send over 100 0's over the serial port just to make it show for 4 seconds. Here is my Java code: prepare for longness

Main.ringBell("100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000");

public static void ringBell(String length) throws Exception {
     output.write(length.getBytes());
     output.flush();
}

Here is the Arduino sketch:

int ledPin = 13;

void setup() {
    pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
    Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
    if(Serial.available() > 0) {
        digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
        delay(Serial.read());
        digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
    }
}

Does anyone see a error in my code? If so, please just let me know what's wrong and I'll fix it.

Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are not sending one big number to the arduino but several ASCII bytes. The Arduino will see this sequence:

49, 48, 48, 48, 48, 48, ...

In each loop it will read one byte and wait for that number of milliseconds. 49 or 48 milliseconds are not a long time. So what you have is a constant flicker of the LED which is to fast to see with the eye.

The next thing is: You are sending the bytes in one flush. But the Arduino has only a small internal buffer of 64 byte (see available docu). The rest is simply forgotten.

Lets calculate roughly: 64 bytes * (48 ms delay per byte ) is 3072ms. Yes, this sounds plausible.

Next thing would be: delay only can handle arguments of type unsigned long which is 32 bit which translates to ~4,000,000,000 milliseconds you can wait. Your argument in Main is way beyond this limit.

So: The easiest thing is to use parseInt instead of read. And in Main supply only numbers in the range of a positive int (0.. 32767). And also do some delays in your Main before sending the next ringBell.

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Thanks, I'll try that. –  cheese5505 Jul 25 '12 at 20:14
    
It has defiantly improved, but it still does not ring for 8 seconds when I send "8000". I replaced "read()" with "parseInt()" and that is what made the difference, so do you know how to make it run for 8 seconds with "8000"? –  cheese5505 Jul 28 '12 at 23:32
    
You can store the result of parseInt into a variable and print that to the Serial stream. Then you can test you code in the Arduino "Serial Monitor" more easily by comparing what has been sent and what has been received. –  A.H. Jul 29 '12 at 7:45
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