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Input

2012-07-24 10:05:08 AM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM

Desired Output

2012-07-24 10:05:08 AM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM

Code I tried

 sort -t ":" -k 1 -k 2 -k 3 Input.txt | sort -t " " -k 3

But I am not getting desired output.

Can anyone suggest anything?


I wrote a code... but still problem persists...

Code

 sed 's/ 12:/00:/g' Input.txt | sort -k 1,1 -k 3,3 -k 2,2 | sed 's/00:/12:/g'

First change 12:43:01 AM to 00:43:01 AM....and then apply sort command.

share|improve this question
3  
What is the desired output? –  user647772 Jul 25 '12 at 8:16
    
@Tichodroma updated –  Debaditya Jul 25 '12 at 8:21
1  
PM before AM? Is that really desired? –  steffen Jul 25 '12 at 8:21
    
@steffen according to timestamp .... (date,time,AM/PM) –  Debaditya Jul 25 '12 at 8:22
    
A bit confused, in the input I see a row: 2012-07-24 10:13:58 PM, and in the output I see the row changed to: 2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM –  Jon Lin Jul 25 '12 at 8:55

9 Answers 9

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Convert to Epoch Seconds for Sorting

Assuming that your data is stored in /tmp/foo, you can convert the timestamp into a numerically-sortable format with GNU date. For example:

date -f /tmp/foo '+%s' | sort |
while read; do
    date -d "@$REPLY" "+%F %I:%M:%S %p"
done

This should correctly handle the sort in all cases, and especially the cases where all AM times should come before all PM times on the same date. For example, 12:01 AM is now listed before 10:00 PM.

share|improve this answer
    
Or skip the while loops: date --file /tmp/foo +%s | sort | sed 's/^/@/' | date --file - "+%F %I:%M:%S %p". The sed is a bit of a wart, but c'est la vie. –  chepner Jul 25 '12 at 13:48

The strings could simply be sorted lexically except for the 12-hour times.

This solution uses the Schwartzian Transform to change the key that is used to sort the strings. It just adds twelve to the hour field of any string ending with PM and sorts by that instead.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @data = <DATA>;
chomp @data;

my @sorted = map $_->[0],
sort { $a->[1] cmp $b->[1] }
map { (my $dt = $_) =~ s/(\d\d)(?=:\d\d:\d\d PM)/$1+12/e; [$_, $dt] } @data;

print "$_\n" for @sorted;


__DATA__
2012-07-24 10:05:08 AM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM

output

2012-07-24 10:05:08 AM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM

Update

As steffen has pointed out, even after adjusting the hours for am/pm, midnight and midday still prevent a simple string sort from working.

This program uses the core Time::Piece module to reformat the date/times in ISO 8601 format 2000-02-29T12:34:56 which can be sorted lexically.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;

my @data = <DATA>;
chomp @data;

my @sorted = map $_->[0],
sort { $a->[1] cmp $b->[1] }
map { [ $_, toISO8601($_) ] } @data;

sub toISO8601 {
  Time::Piece->strptime(@_, '%Y-%m-%d %I:%M:%S %p')->datetime;
}

print "$_\n" for @sorted;

__DATA__
2012-07-24 10:05:08 AM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM
2012-08-01 01:00:00 PM
2012-08-01 12:30:00 PM
2012-08-01 12:00:00 PM
2012-08-01 11:30:00 AM
2012-08-01 01:00:00 AM
2012-08-01 12:30:00 AM
2012-08-01 12:00:00 AM

output

2012-07-24 10:05:08 AM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM
2012-08-01 12:00:00 AM
2012-08-01 12:30:00 AM
2012-08-01 01:00:00 AM
2012-08-01 11:30:00 AM
2012-08-01 12:00:00 PM
2012-08-01 12:30:00 PM
2012-08-01 01:00:00 PM
share|improve this answer
1  
That leaves you with the problem, that 12:01 AM is earlier than 1:01 AM... –  steffen Jul 25 '12 at 11:42
    
Thanks @steffen. I've edited my answer. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 12:58
    
Also, List::UtilsBy::nsort_by() might help you there, rather than the map/sort/map triplet. nsort_by { Time::Piece->strptime($_,'%Y-%m-%d %I:%M:%S %p')->epoch } @data –  LeoNerd Jul 25 '12 at 15:02

a little bit awkward, I admit...

cat Input.txt | \ awk 'BEGIN{FS="[: -]"}{if($7 == "PM") $4+=12; print $1"-"$2"-"$3" "$4":"$5":"$6" "$7}'|\ sort|\ awk 'BEGIN{FS="[: -]"}{if($7 == "PM") $4-=12; print $1"-"$2"-"$3" "$4":"$5":"$6" "$7}'

edit:

cat Input.txt |\
awk 'BEGIN{FS="[: -]"}{if(length($4)==1) $4="0"$4 ;if($7 == "PM") $4+=12; else if($4 ==12)$4-=12; print $1"-"$2"-"$3" "$4":"$5":"$6" "$7}'|\
sort|\
awk 'BEGIN{FS="[: -]"}{if($7 == "PM") $4-=12; else if($4 ==0)$4+=12; print $1"-"$2"-"$3" "$4":"$5":"$6" "$7}'

But it works...

explanation: I convert the time format to 24 hours using awk, sort it and convert it back.

edit: I prepend a 0 to hours with only one digit in order to get 1:0:0 and 12:0:0 sorted right. Also for AM.

share|improve this answer
    
but its not able to differentiate 1:42AM and 12:05AM of the same date....not able to sort that –  Debaditya Jul 25 '12 at 9:36
    
correct, I edit my answer. –  steffen Jul 25 '12 at 9:44

Using Schartzian Transform and Date::Parse :

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;
use Date::Parse;

my @data = <DATA>;
chomp @data;

my @sorted = 
    map  { $_->[0] }
    sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] }
    map  { [$_, str2time($_)] } @data;

say for @sorted;

__DATA__
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 01:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 12:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 01:26:08 AM
2012-07-25 12:26:08 AM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 AM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM

output:

2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 12:26:08 AM
2012-07-25 01:26:08 AM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 AM
2012-07-25 12:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 01:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM
share|improve this answer
    
The comparison operator should be <=> because str2time returns a POSIX time value. For the same reason your solution won't work for dates before 1970. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 13:04
    
@Borodin: You're right, I've changed the operator. And it doesn't work for dates before 1970 but I leave the answer for usage with dates after 1969 –  M42 Jul 25 '12 at 13:17

12:01 AM comes before 1:01 AM, so I can't see how using just sort will help.

You need to convert to some other format, e.g. ISO 8601 or seconds since whenever to get something that can be compared as text or numbers. A perl oneliner will do that.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, without that problem you'd do it like this: sort -k 1,1 -k 3,3 -k 2,2 Input.txt –  ams Jul 25 '12 at 8:38
    
@robinr yes...dat is the problem..."12:01 AM comes before 1:01 AM".. –  Debaditya Jul 25 '12 at 9:38

You can use this:

sed 's/ 12:/ 00:/'| LC_ALL="C" sort -k 1,1 -k 3 | sed 's/ 00:/ 12:/'

It should be pretty fast solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, how about that? So it does! The -h option is relatively new though: I know for a fact Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) did not have it. –  ams Jul 26 '12 at 12:32
    
@ams You are right it is pretty new feature and it even doesn't work. I have make new one which definitely work. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jul 26 '12 at 15:12
    
Your new solution appears to sort by date and AM/PM, but not the time? –  ams Jul 26 '12 at 15:18
    
Incidentally, given that -h works so well with AM/PM, I suspect not working with 12<1 is a bug in sort. –  ams Jul 26 '12 at 15:20
    
@ams: Use --debug sort parameter and you will see sort is automatically adding sort by whole line as last sorting rule so it will sort by time in this last rule because key 1 (date) is already there. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jul 26 '12 at 15:32

There is my variant:

$sed 's|\([0-9]\+\)-\([0-9]\+\)-\([0-9]\+\) \([0-9]\+\):\([0-9]\+\):\([0-9]\+\) \([A-Z]\+\)|\1 \2 \3 \4 \5 \6 \7 \0|' input.txt | awk '{if($7=="AM"){$7="1";if($4==12){$4 = 0}}else{$7="0"};print}' | sort -n -k1 -k2 -k3 -k4 -k5 -k6 -k7 | cut -d' ' -f 8-
2012-07-24 10:05:08 PM
2012-07-24 10:13:58 AM
2012-07-24 10:57:50 AM
2012-07-24 11:15:03 AM
2012-07-24 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-25 11:26:08 PM
2012-07-26 10:13:58 AM

The main idea to add extra fields, sort by them and after sorted I get rid of them. Sorting numerics is simple, but to sort AM/PM I convert it to 1/0 digits to simplify sorting.

Updated: sed + awk usage may be replaced by awk:

awk -F'[-: ]' '{printf("%d %d %d %d %d %d %d %s\n", $1, $2, $3, ($4 == 12 && $7 == "AM" ? 0 : $4), $5, $6, $7 == "AM", $0)}' input.txt |
sort -n -k1 -k2 -k3 -k4 -k5 -k6 -k7 |
cut -d' ' -f 8-

Updated: fix AM/PM issue

share|improve this answer
    
+1 because sed rules –  steffen Jul 25 '12 at 9:48
    
Hey ... i used your concept...but in other way...i changed 12:01 AM to 00:21 AM and applied the sort command and agian replaced 00 with 12.... Thanks :) –  Debaditya Jul 25 '12 at 10:09
    
-1 because it doesn't work... 12:05:50 AM is sorted after 11:26:08 PM –  steffen Jul 25 '12 at 11:50
    
@steffen I've updated my answer and fix this issue. Thanks! –  Slava Semushin Jul 25 '12 at 12:41
    
now 10:57:50 AM is sorted after 10:13:58 PM ;) you're getting there. I know how it feels... –  steffen Jul 25 '12 at 12:45

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 's/.*/echo -e "$(date -d"&" +%s)\t&"/e' file | sort -n | sed 's/.*\t//'

or:

date -f file +%s | paste - file | sort -n | sed 's/\S\+\s\+//'
share|improve this answer

Finally I coded without using any external modules. Though its lengthy but working smoothly for any date format.

Technique Used :

  1. First covert each date in the file to its timestamp
  2. Sort the timestamp as they are in numbers.
  3. Again convert the timestamp into date using scalar localtime.

Code

my @input = `cat Input.txt`;

    open (ts,">","tt.txt");
    foreach my $i (@input)
    {
            chomp($i);
            my $timestamp = `date --date "$i" +\%s`;
            chomp($timestamp);
            push (@time,$timestamp);
            print ts "$timestamp\n";
    }
    close(ts);

    open (ts,">","sort_time.txt");
    my @sorted_time = join "\n",sort {$a<=>$b} @time;
    chomp(@sorted_time);
    print ts "@sorted_time\n";
    close(ts);

    my @input1=  `cat sort_time.txt`;
    open (ts,">","sort_timestamp.txt");
    foreach my $st1 (@input1)
    {
            chomp($st1);
            my $st2 = scalar localtime($st1);
            chomp($st2);
            print ts "$st2\n";
    }
    close(ts);



    @input2 = `cat sort_timestamp.txt`;
    open (ts,">","Output.txt");
    foreach my $st2 (@input2)
    {
            chomp($st2);
            $pro_time = `date --date "$st2" +\%Y-\%m-\%d~\%r | sed 's/~/ /g'`;
            chomp($pro_time);
            print ts "$pro_time\n";
    }
    close(ts);


    `rm tt.txt sort_time.txt sort_timestamp.txt`;
share|improve this answer
    
Any particular reason you decided to reimplement the date utility in perl by shelling out to date? –  chepner Jul 27 '12 at 15:52
    
Downvote .... when the answer is wrong/incorrect.... –  Debaditya Jul 27 '12 at 16:16
    
This is wildly inefficient, and I see no benefit over the answers already given by CodeGnome and others. If there are restrictions in your work environment, you should post them in the original question. As it is, most of the work in your perl code is done by going out to shell, the rest is more efficiently handled in shell as well, so why use perl at all? If this had to be done in perl, you could use one of the perfectly fine bash answers in a single use of backticks. –  chepner Jul 27 '12 at 16:32
    
@chepner I agree with you ... should have posted my restrictions ... i will take care the next time ... Thanks !! –  Debaditya Jul 27 '12 at 16:41

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