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I am facing issues with perl chomp function. I have a test.csv as below:

col1,col2
vm1,fd1
vm2,fd2
vm3,fd3
vm4,fd4

I want to print the 2nd field of this csv. This is my code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;

my $file = "test.csv";
open (my $FH, '<', $file);
my @array = (<$FH>);
close $FH;

foreach (@array)
{
    my @row = split (/,/,$_);
    my $var = chomp ($row[1]);     ###   <<< this is the problem
    print $var;
}

The output of aboe code is :

11111

I really don't know where the "1" is comming from. Actually, the last filed can be printed as below:

foreach (@array)
{
    my @row = split (/,/,$_);
    print $row[1];     ###  << Note that I am not printing "\n"
}  

the output is:

vm_cluster
fd1
fd2
fd3
fd4

Now, i am using these field values as an input to the DB and the DB INSERT statement is failing due this invisible newline. So I thought chomp would help me here. instead of chomping, it gives me "11111".

Could you help me understand what am i doing wrong here.

Thanks.

Adding more information after reading loldop's responce:

If I write as below, then it will not print anything (not even the "11111" output mentioned above)

foreach (@array)
{
    my @row = split (/,/,$_);
    chomp ($row[1]); 
    my $var = $row[1]; 
    print $var;
}

Meaning, chomp is removing the last string and the trailing new line.

share|improve this question
    
chomp return 1 if this function ending successfully. so, just chomp $_; $mygoodvar = $_; –  gaussblurinc Jul 25 '12 at 8:39
    
@pavel: I did. But this isn't a straight forward issue answered in the documentation. Not even google. –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:07
1  
It looks pretty straightforward to me. The documentation says [chomp] returns the total number of characters removed from all its arguments. So it returns 1 because it has removed one newline. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 9:22
    
@Borodin: true. But in this case, it is removing the last string as well which is undesirable. Thnaks for your time –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:25
    
It isn't removing the last string. You are chomping $row[1], and it removes a newline from the end of $row[1]. Print the value of $row[1] and you will see. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 9:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason you see only a string of 1s is that you are printing the value of $val which is the value returned from chomp. chomp doesn't return the trimmed string, it modifies its parameter in-place and returns the number of characters removed from the end. Since it always removes exactly one "\n" character you get a 1 output for each element of the array.

You really should use warnings instead of the -w command-line option, and there is no reason here to read the entire file into an array. But well done on using a lexical filehandle with the three-parameter form of open.

Here is a quick refactoring of your program that will do what you want.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $file = 'test.csv';
open my $FH, '<', $file or die qq(Unable to open "$file": $!);

while (<$FH>) {
    chomp;
    my @row = split /,/;
    print $row[1], "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is it. Thanks you so much. This is working fine. I am not able to understand what was wrong in my approach though. thanks for your time. –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:44
2  
@Dheeraj: please try to understand. You were printing the return value from chomp. chomp returns 1 so you were printing 1. Instead you should have been printing the chomped data in $row[1]. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 9:46
    
Funny thing, this code works on my fedora but on ubuntu, it gives no output. they both are running perl 5.10.1 –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:49
    
actually, on ubuntu, it doesn't show the output unless i add "\n" to the print statement. it might be bugfferring or something. –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:54
    
@Dheeraj: I am pretty sure that either your data file is either empty or the open fails. I have modified my solution above: please try this code instead as the original ignored open errors and continued regardless. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 9:54

So, I was quite frustrated with this easy looking task bugging me for the whole day long. I really appreciate everyone who responded.

Finaly I ended up using Text::CSV perl module and then calling each of the CSV field as array reference. There was no need left to run the chomp after using Text::CSV.

Here is the code:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use warnings;
use strict;
use Text::CSV;


 my $csv = Text::CSV->new ( { binary => 1 } )  # should set binary attribute.
                  or die "Cannot use CSV: ".Text::CSV->error_diag ();


open my $fh, "<:encoding(utf8)", "vm.csv" or die "vm.csv: $!";

<$fh>;  ## this is to remove the column headers.

while ( my $row = $csv->getline ($fh) )
{
    print $row->[1];
}

and here is hte output:

fd1fd2fd3fd4 

Later i was pulled these individual values and inserted into the DB.

Thanks everyone.

share|improve this answer

If you simply want to get rid of new lines you can use a regex:

my $var = $row[1];
$var=~s/\n//g;
share|improve this answer
    
for what reason you use substitution? it is weird for this task –  gaussblurinc Jul 25 '12 at 8:51
    
Why not? Maybe it's weird but it works and matches his purpose :) –  raz3r Jul 25 '12 at 8:54
1  
because regular expressions - expensive tool, really. this task, in fact, need only one: find last letter, compare with \n and delete if true. i know, that to kill a bird, you use cannon, ok. it is your style, mister Norris –  gaussblurinc Jul 25 '12 at 8:58
    
this substitution also removed the last word and gives no visible output. thanks. –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:00
1  
@raz3r: It seems perverse to use a regex substitution (especially a global one that will only ever match once) to remove the line terminator from the end of a string when there is a perfectly good built-in function chomp designed to do exactly that. –  Borodin Jul 25 '12 at 9:43

although, it is my fault at the beginning.
chomp function return 1 <- result of usage this function.
also, you can find this bad example below. but it will works, if you use numbers. sometimes i use this cheat (don't do that! it is my bad-hack code!)
map{/filter/ && $_;}@all_to_filter;
instead of this, use
grep{/filter/}@all_to_filter;

foreach (@array)
{
    my @row = split (/,/,$_);
    my $var = chomp ($row[1]) * $row[1];     ###   this is bad code!
    print $var;
}

foreach (@array)
{
    my @row = split (/,/,$_);
    chomp ($row[1]);
    my $var = $row[1];  
    print $var;
}
share|improve this answer
    
the 2nd foreach loop you mentioned is not working. I have edited my original question with this information at the bottom of it. Thnaks. –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 8:58
    
codepad.org/oVHRlqVy –  gaussblurinc Jul 25 '12 at 9:01
    
I think I should not be using "split". I am not sure but I think the 2nd field that I am looking for has some invisible characters after "split" is executed. But i can't tthink anything else apart form "split" either :) –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:02
    
loldop, I agree with what you have mentioned on the codepad. i have done that excersize already. but this is not working on the CSV I have mentioned. A really appreciate your time. Thank you. –  slayedbylucifer Jul 25 '12 at 9:05
    
FYI: maybe your CSV is really strange and you need to use CPAN-modules such as metacpan.org/module/Text::CSV or something nearly. –  gaussblurinc Jul 25 '12 at 9:08

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