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I have 2 html elements: A and B, here is the jquery code:

$('A').click(function(){
    $('B').click(function(){
        console.log("hello");
    })
})

when I click A and then click B, it will show me "hello", which is fine. But when I click A again and then click B, this time it shows me TWO "hello", which is undesirable. I only want ONE hello.

I more or less know the reason, it might be the result of the callback function: B is still waiting for user to click it after the first click.

now my question is: if I still want "clicking B" inside "clicking A" ("clicking B" is a callback function of "clicking A"), how can I solve the double result problem?

I am new to the callback function, please help!!!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is, that each consecutive click on A adds another click-handler to your B. Each of these handlers get executed when you click on B. So if you click A ten times, you have bound ten clickhandlers to B :-D

To avoid the problems of the other solutions, constant un- and rebinding and global variables which both are nasty, use this clean solution instead:

$('A').one("click", function(){
    $('B').click(function(){
        console.log("hello");
    })
})

By using .one() instead of click, the click-event on A is triggered only once, binding exactly one click-eventhandler to your element B.

Example Fiddle

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Thanks a lot, it seems much simpler than other solutions, but is there any defect about the solution? –  webberpuma Jul 25 '12 at 12:34
    
@webberpuma Well, after re-reading your statement I have the following question: Shall the User be able to click B only once after he clicked A one time? Or is he allowed to click B as often as he likes once he clicked A? –  Christoph Jul 25 '12 at 13:22

Your current code doesn't do quite what you think it does. Every time you click A, it adds a new click-handler to B. So if you click A 3 times, you've got 3 click-handlers on B, all of which execute when B is clicked.

One fix would be to unregister Bs click handler inside As click handler, e.g:

$('A').click(function(){
    // Ensure we only ever have one click-handler on B
    // by clearing existing handlers before adding our
    // new one.
    $('B').unbind('click').click(function(){
        console.log("hello");
    })
})

However, this code has the side effect of removing all of Bs handlers, which you may not want. The more robust version, which only removes the specific handler is to create a named handler, rather than an anonymous handler, and add and remove that. This allows you to target the specific handler you want. You can also do this using namespacing (see the documentation for unbind and look for "Namespaces").

var helloHandlerForB = function() { console.log("hello"); };

$('A').click(function(){
    // Ensure we only ever have one click-handler on B
    // by clearing existing handlers before adding our
    // new one.
    $('B').unbind('click', helloHandlerForB).click(helloHandlerForB);
})
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working but ugly solution. Seriously, you don't want to un- and re-bind an Eventhandler everytime you click? –  Christoph Jul 25 '12 at 9:38
    
@Christoph The other solution I can think of is using global variables, which is even less pretty! EDIT And I've just noticed Bondye has helpfully provided this approach as well :) –  RB. Jul 25 '12 at 9:41
    
sure? take a look at my answer;) –  Christoph Jul 25 '12 at 9:56
    
Thanks for your answer, there seems to be a simpler way to solve the problem, (solution 3), is there any defect about his solution? –  webberpuma Jul 25 '12 at 12:36

You also could make a Boolean to check if a was clicked.

Example: fiddle

var aIsClicked = false; //boolean

$('#A').click(function(){
   $('#log').html('clicked on A');
   aIsClicked = true;
});

$('#B').click(function(){
   if(aIsClicked) //check if a was clicked
   {
       $('#log').html('clicked on B and A was clicked');
       alert("hello");
   }
    else
    {
        $('#log').html('clicked on B and A was not clicked');
    }
});​

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Add a little explanation and the code and get +1. –  Christoph Jul 25 '12 at 9:37

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