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Suppose you have a red-black tree that is a valid binary search tree and does not violate any of those rules:

  • A node is either red or black.
  • The root is black.
  • All leaves (NIL) are black.
  • Both children of every red node are black.
  • Every simple path from a given node to any of its descendant leaves contains the same number of black nodes.

Such an red-black tree looks like this: enter image description here

Does every possible tree that meets these restrictions have a sequence of insertions and deletions so that the red-black tree is generated?

I am asking this question, because I think about writing a blog article about red-black-trees and I would like to give some examples.

If you want to test a counter-example: Here is a red-black tree implementation in python with an implemented function to generate the image.

To clarify the question: We make a game.

  • I draw a red-black tree, that meets all the restrictions.
  • You have to find a sequence of insertions and deletions, so that you end up with my red black tree.

Can I draw a red-black tree so that you can't win?

The colors are important! If the tree has a different shape or different colors, it is not the same red-black tree.

You should at least know how to generate these two red-black-trees: enter image description here enter image description here

Note that this is only a check for you if it could work. If you only know how to get these two red-black trees, you can't answer this question!

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I tried to dust off my computer science knowledge of graph theory and the whole thing fell apart when I touched it... Kidding aside, you might want to cross post this to cstheory.stackexchange.com to get more of the right kind of attention. –  Patrick M Aug 3 '12 at 19:14

4 Answers 4

I believe inserting the nodes in breadth-first (level-order) traversal will yield any red-black tree.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_traversal#Queue-based_level_order_traversal

Because you insert them in level order you can't have a tree that is less balanced than the original tree. No deletions are necessary, and no rotations are needed during insertion. In your example you should insert them in the following order:

13,8,17,1,11,15,25,6,22,27

Edit: While this will generate a binary search tree with the proper values and shape this may not generate the proper colors... it depends on the implementation of the insert function. The reason is the definition of red-black trees allow for variations in the color of nodes when the tree has more than one node and is full and all leaves are at the same depth - following Wikipedia's definition this is a "perfect" binary tree:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_tree#Types_of_binary_trees

Suppose the tree has three nodes with values {1,2,3} where "2" is the root and is, by definition, black. Nodes {1,3} could be either both black or both red without violating the red-black rules. So a perfectly valid implementation of a red-black insertion could detect when the tree is "perfect" and color every node black. Such an implementation would prevent ever being able to construct a tree that, for example, alternates black and red at each level.

Edit 2: Given that both red-black trees are possible inputs (all three nodes black, and nodes 1 and 3 red) this settles the question about whether deletions are needed, if there is a solution then deletions are necessary. The question in my mind now is whether there is only one way to implement a red-black tree insertion/deletion. If there is more than one, and if they yield different trees, then the player of the game would have to understand the implementation in order specify the order of insertions and deletions to construct a given red-black tree. I don't know enough about the implementation of red-black trees to answer the question of whether there is only one way to implement them or whether there is more than one.

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Oh my, I get a chilling feeling whenever I read an answer that is just obviously correct. +1 sir. –  Patrick M Aug 4 '12 at 20:46
    
Thank you, it is not a formal proof but seems intuitive. A proof is an argument that convinces someone of something, so it seems to have succeeded. –  amdn Aug 4 '12 at 20:58
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"So a perfectly valid implementation of a red-black insertion could detect when the tree is "perfect" and color every node black.": No, it can't detect that. If you would like to detect if the tree is perfect, you would have to traverse the three. That is not in O(log n). So your insertion and your deletion would not be in O(log n), which is the most important charactersitic of a red-black tree. That it is possible to get the right shape is obvious, but it is not so obvious that you can get the right colors. You have to use deletion if you want to get all possible RB-trees with three nodes –  moose Aug 5 '12 at 7:47
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I've added two example red-black trees. No matter how you implement the insertion, if you insert the nodes in the order you suggested, you cannot get both red-black trees only by using insertion. –  moose Aug 5 '12 at 8:03

I think what you're asking for here is a formal proof of whether or not any arbitrary, legitimate red-black tree can be constructed by a series of insertions and deletions provided the tree is rebalanced after each operation. I'm not going to attempt such a proof, but I think I have an idea for how you could construct such a proof.

I would exhaustively cover all possible sub trees involving all legal permutations around single node and prove that it can be constructed. So:

  • black node
    • no parent
      • left child null
        • right child null
        • right child not null
      • left child not null
        • right child null
        • right child not null
    • is the left child
      • same as above
    • is the right child
      • same as above
  • red node (can't have no parent)
    • is the left child
      • same as above
    • is the right child
      • same as above

And then you have to create an inductive step showing that any arbitrary tree is a permutation of the cases shown above. It seems pretty straight forward, when I put it that way, but like I mentioned in my comment, I'm way too rusty to tackle the actual proof.

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I think the branch of math that deals with that type of problem is graph theory, and looking into some graph theory papers that verify properities of red black and other balanced trees, I'm led to this paper: http://www.math.unipd.it/~baldan/Papers/Soft-copy-pdf/cosmicah05.pdf and http://www.math.unipd.it/~baldan/Papers/Soft-copy-pdf/cosmicah05.pdf and this paper http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.87.1161&rep=rep1&type=pdf , they should be able to answer your queries on the abstract properties. Or at least help you phrase your question in a way that leads to even better resources.

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Two of the three links are actually the same link. Did you want to provide another one? Additionally, I can't find an answer to my question in those papers (but I have to read them more carefully, this will take some time) –  moose Jul 31 '12 at 7:28

if a tree follow these rules:

  • A node is either red or black.
  • The root is black.
  • All leaves (NIL) are black.
  • Both children of every red node are black.
  • Every simple path from a given node to any of its descendant leaves contains the same number of black nodes.

It will be a balanced binary tree and can be called red-black tree.

Red-Black tree insertion and deletion have special condition and rules. If tree as in your example follow the algorithm of RB tree insertion and deletion, it will always be a RB tree. During insertion and deletion, an unbalanced binary tree will always restored to a balanced tree by changing node color, Rotating node or branch.

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This does not answer my question. I've asked: "Does every possible tree that meets these restrictions have a sequence of insertions and deletions so that the red-black tree is generated?" not "Is it possible to create the datastructure RB-Tree for any input" –  moose Aug 4 '12 at 8:40
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@Moose if a tree meets all the restriction after sequence of insertion or deletion( if there are nodes). It is a RB-tree. –  Kishor Sharma Aug 4 '12 at 9:02
    
Correct. But does such a sequence exist for every tree that meets all the restrictions? I have added another way to rephrase my question. –  moose Aug 4 '12 at 9:40
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Answer to your game is NO. If you follow the rules during insertion and deletion you will always end up with a RB tree. During my learning phase of RB tree i tried many combinations. –  Kishor Sharma Aug 4 '12 at 11:49
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I assumed data are sortable, then you will not be able to get it. And data which can not be sortable i dont know if there exist a RB tree for them. And if you see the algo., When you insert a data and if conditions are not satisfied tree will be balanced till root same with deletion. So After insertion and deletion tree will balance itself using restructuring or recoloring. And we can balance any binary tree if it is unbalanced. Hence, No is the answer, Unless you can find a binary tree which cannot be balanced by any algo. –  Kishor Sharma Aug 4 '12 at 12:11

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