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sock.setblocking(0)
try:
    data = sock.recv(1024)
 except socket.error, e:
    if e.args[0] == errno.EWOULDBLOCK: 
          print 'EWOULDBLOCK'
else:            
   if not data:   #recv over
      sock.close()
      print 'close================='       
   else:
      print 'recv ---data---------'
      poem += data

all above code is in a loop.using non-blocking socket(just want to test 'non-blocking socket') to get data. But always print 'EWOULDBLOCK',i don't know why?

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Add all the code including setting up the socket and what Python version and OS you are running on. –  StefanE Jul 25 '12 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The socket is non-blocking so recv() will raise an exception if there is no data to read. Note that errno.EWOULDBLOCK = errno.EAGAIN = 11. This is Python's (well the OS really) way of telling you to try the recv() again later.

I note that you close the socket each time you get this exception. That's not going to help at all. Your code should be something like this:

import socket, errno, time

sock = socket.socket()
sock.connect(('hostname', 1234))
sock.setblocking(0)

while True:
    try:
        data = sock.recv(1024)
        if not data:
            print "connection closed"
            sock.close()
            break
        else:
            print "Received %d bytes: '%s'" % (len(data), data)
    except socket.error, e:
        if e.args[0] == errno.EWOULDBLOCK: 
            print 'EWOULDBLOCK'
            time.sleep(1)           # short delay, no tight loops
        else:
            print e
            break

For this sort of thing, the select module is usually the way to go.

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thanks.I find the problem is i miss time.sleep(1).without it the print is all ''EWOULDBLOCK''.so why 'no tight loops' is indispensable? –  zhenyuyang Jul 25 '12 at 13:04
    
@zhenyuyang I don't understand 'I miss', but tight loops just waste CPU cycles when it could be doing something else, like running other threads or processes. If you keep getting EWOULDBLOCK there is no data to read. If you don't want that condition why are you using non-blocking mode? –  EJP Jul 26 '12 at 2:21

The exception is raised by design, cause you are using non-blocking IO.

The major mechanical difference is that send, recv, connect and accept can return without having done anything. You have (of course) a number of choices. You can check return code and error codes and generally drive yourself crazy.

Quoted from Python doc

If you run man errno 3, you shall see the description of EWOULDBLOCK. The exception is reasonable, because there is no data to read yet.

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