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I was wondering if it would be possible to do an other wise type statement within lambda, something similar to:

Have two table structures that looks exactly the same, except for one column, called Synopsis (table 1) and Description (table 2). My component reads either one of the two tables, based on a property, and would like to do a single lambda expression to determine whether the column exists:

(from p in table[this.TableName]
 where (p["Description"] != null)
 'otherwise' where (p["Synopsis"] != null)
 select p).First();

Appreciate the help.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Providing that accessing a non-existent column doesn't thrown an exception, you should be able to use the logical OR operator (||):

(from p in table[this.TableName]
 where (p["Description"] != null || p["Synopsis"] != null)
 select p).First();
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totally acceptable –  Nero theZero Jul 25 '12 at 11:45

No, you cannot extend the LINQ query comprehension syntax to add new keywords. What you can do is add more extension methods, and write your own logic that way - but it won't really help in this case, because a .Where(...).Otherwise(...) wouldn't actually get any "otherwise" data - the sequence would already have been filtered by the Where(...).

Also: unless that is LINQ-to-Objects, you should probably expect the query interpreter to choke on it. The simpler answer is "no, you can't really do that".

As others have noted, you can just simplify the condition via ||.

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It sounds like the logical OR ("||") is the solution, assuming that your indexers return null for non-existing columns.

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What's wrong with || -

 (from p in table[this.TableName]
  where (p["Description"] != null || p["Synopsis"] != null)
  select p).First();  

???

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