Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does the principles say about put POCO's (Or Models in MVC) in a separate DLL?

The point is to have domain wide objects easier to "move around", when objects are distributed to, and used by, different developers. At this actual scenario "we" are one developer that soon are two. We are going to work with different concerns of systems (and different) dll, but we will share some POCO's and Enums.

public class Customer
{
    public int CustomerId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Questions. Are there some drawbacks create a separate dll for the POCO's and Enums? So called domain wide use. Is it good? Why or why not?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Personally, I will always place my domain classes into separate dlls. You may not see a need for it now, but it will almost always come up later (for instance, if the application architecture needs to change ie. from web forms to mvc). By separating it into a class library (dll), you are enforcing part of the concept of separation of concerns. All of your business logic should be contained in the class library vs. the front end. Then the front end can just focus on navigation without much regard for the class library.

So your up side at the very least would be: separation of concerns, can be redistributed and reused, best practice, cleaner front end code/project.

Down sides are that if you use it in multiple projects, you'll have to control what apps are using what libraries and ensure they have the latest one, or at least the latest relevant one.

So from what it sounds like, in your situation it is just a preferential thing. But imho, its a preference you should adapt.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.