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I have the code snippet below:

var ret_ = function(x){
    return x;
}
var make_cps=function(x,c_){
    return c_(x);
}
var pred = {
    _position: 0,
    setPosition: function (i) {
        _position = i
    },
    getPosition: function () {
        return _position
    },
    _size: 0,
    setSize: function (i) {
        _size = i
    },
    getSize: function () {
        return _size
    },
    _context: null,
    setContext: function (x) {
        _context = x
    },
    run: function () {
        return function (c_) {
            return make_cps(_position, c_);
        }(ret_) == 2;
    }
}    

When I run it like below, it runs correctly:

pred.setPosition(2)  
pred.setSize(10)  
pred.setContext(null)  
var res = pred.run()  
console.log(res)  // Output: true

but if I replace the _position to getPosition() an error occurs as getPosition() is not defined. Also if I change to this.getPosition() it says this doesn't have a member called getPosition()

var pred = {
    _position: 0,
    setPosition: function (i) {
        _position = i
    },
    getPosition: function () {
        return _position
    },
    _size: 0,
    setSize: function (i) {
        _size = i
    },
    getSize: function () {
        return _size
    },
    _context: null,
    setContext: function (x) {
        _context = x
    },
    run: function () {
        return function (c_) {
            return make_cps(this.getPosition(), c_); // gives Error here
        }(ret_) == 2;
    }
}    

Please someone throw light on this issue.

share|improve this question
    
Could it be that it's a c_ that's not defined in this context? –  YePhIcK Jul 25 '12 at 12:04
    
@YePhIcK c_ is defined, it is provided by the ret_ argument to the function. I will add ret_ and make_cps also. –  weima Jul 25 '12 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You've lost your context. Where you've put this.getPosition(), this will return as the window object.

If you alter the line to read

return make_cps(pred.getPosition(), c_);

It will work successfully.

Alternately, you can change the run function to read

run: function () {
  var that = this;

  return function (c_) {
      return make_cps(that.getPosition(), c_);
  }(ret_) == 2;
}

Edit: Clarification

The reason that _position is still working rather than suffering from the same issue is that you're not actually setting prev._position at all in your current code.

setPosition: function (i) {
    _position = i
},
getPosition: function () {
    return _position
}

What it's actually doing there is creating a new global variable called _position and using that instead.

This code should actually read:

setPosition: function (i) {
    this._position = i
},
getPosition: function () {
    return this._position
},
share|improve this answer
    
in my real application i have the pred object as an anonymous object, so i cant use pred in place of this. Also my real question is why _position can work but getPosition() cannot. –  weima Jul 25 '12 at 12:10
    
@weima In which case, use the alternative version (at the bottom). The reason _position works but getPosition doesn't is that you're currently using _position incorrectly in your code. You're currently setting and getting _position rather than the position variable in prev, making a new global called _position. As such, it doesn't care about context so your issue doesn't occur. –  Doug Jul 25 '12 at 12:13
    
Wonderful. Thanks :). It works. and it gives me new insight into JavaScript programming. –  weima Jul 25 '12 at 12:15
    
@Dolonro, you mean is a property has set/get methods, it becomes global? sorry i didn't get that right :( –  weima Jul 25 '12 at 12:17
    
@weima Nay, it becomes global because you've not correctly referenced the variable you were trying to edit. See my edit above –  Doug Jul 25 '12 at 12:22

This is setting a global variable _position:

setPosition: function (i) {
    _position = i
},

It is not the variable on your pred object.

When you access it here:

run: function () {
    return function (c_) {
        return make_cps(_position, c_);
    }(ret_) == 2;
}

you're using that global variable.

If you want to use instance properties, you're going to need to start using this:

setPosition: function (i) {
    this._position = i
},


run: function () {
    var pred = this;
    return function (c_) {
        return make_cps(pred._position, c_);
    }(ret_) == 2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. i get it. But i dont have any global property called _position. you mean property is created automatically? –  weima Jul 25 '12 at 12:19
    
Yes, you create it with _position = i;. –  Scott Sauyet Jul 25 '12 at 12:49

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