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I use following code for guarantee startTime variable set once only:

public class Processor
{
    private Date startTime;

    public void doProcess()
    {
        if(startTime == null)
            synchronized(this)
            {
                  if(startTime == null)
                  {
                     startTime = new Date();
                  }
            }

        // do somethings
    }
}

I will guarantee by this code for variable instantiated once only for any number of invoking process method call.

My question is:

Is there alternative approach for my code be more concise? (for sample remove if & synchronized statements)

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@Eng.Fouad No, I don't know about it. –  MJM Jul 25 '12 at 12:21
    
I think you can use atomic reference: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… –  Suzan Cioc Jul 25 '12 at 12:22
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Based on you comments, you could use AtomicReference

firstStartTime.compareAndSet(null, new Date());

or AtomicLong

firstStartTime.compareAndSet(0L, System.currentTimeMillis());

I would use

private final Date startTime = new Date();

or

private final long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Exactly. The other way is far too much work. –  duffymo Jul 25 '12 at 12:20
    
The idea seems to be to trigger the startTime when doProcess is called... So I suppose you are suggesting to start the timer when a Processor object is created. –  assylias Jul 25 '12 at 12:21
    
But in this case startTime will contains timestamp when class was loaded, not when method was called first time? –  dbf Jul 25 '12 at 12:22
1  
+1 This is the perfect fit for OP's requirement. Proper semantics, no object waste, full speed. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 25 '12 at 13:28
1  
MJM, you won't get any better without locking. If there was something very, very heavy involved, say a million times heavier than a Date, you'd realistically need something more. In that case you should read about the proper way to implement the double-check idiom, for example here. It's straight from Josh Bloch's mouth. For your requirement that idiom is not a perfect fit for being an overkill by many orders of magnitude. In fact, with 100 calls per minute, even this is overkill. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 25 '12 at 13:40
show 12 more comments

Use AtomicReference:

public class Processor {
  private final AtomicReference<Date> startTime = new AtomicReference<Date>();
  public void doProcess() {
    if (this.startTime.compareAndSet(null, new Date())) {
      // do something first time only
    }
    // do somethings
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is the way to go. –  aioobe Jul 25 '12 at 12:24
    
This wastes a Date instance for every call, it can be improved. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 25 '12 at 12:25
    
This doesn't do the same thing as the OP's code. He wants to initialize startTime only the first time doProcess() is called. –  Alex D Jul 25 '12 at 12:36
    
@AlexD you're right, I fixed the code –  yegor256 Jul 25 '12 at 12:39
1  
you can change the if block to if((startTime.get() == null) && startTime.compareAndSet(null, new Date())) –  jtahlborn Jul 25 '12 at 13:58
show 4 more comments

Your code is an example of so called "double check locking." Please read this article. It explains why this trick does not work in java although it is very smart.

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Brien Goetz is very smart, but that article is 11 years old. The JVM has certainly changed a great deal since then. I'd wonder if there was a more recent article that dealt with JVM 6 or newer. –  duffymo Jul 25 '12 at 12:21
1  
@duffymo The semantics have not changed and this idiom is still a failure. The only relevant change was the fixed semantics of volatile that happened with Java 1.5. volatile is BTW exactly what OP needs to fix this. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 25 '12 at 12:24
    
Thank you for the nice update, Marko. –  duffymo Jul 25 '12 at 12:26
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To sum up what other posters have already explained:

private volatile Date startTime;

public void doProcess()
{
   if(startTime == null) startTime = new Date();
   // ...
}

Concise enough for you?

share|improve this answer
    
This is not thread-safe. –  Tudor Jul 25 '12 at 12:39
    
@Alex I wrote your suggestion first but thinking over it and found it isn't thread-safe. –  MJM Jul 25 '12 at 12:50
    
The only danger is that multiple threads could initialize startTime redundantly, which wouldn't cause anything bad to happen. –  Alex D Jul 25 '12 at 12:52
1  
BTW, java.lang.String uses the same strategy for lazily initializing its cached hash value. If the above code is "not thread-safe", that means java.lang.String is also "not thread-safe". –  Alex D Jul 26 '12 at 3:24
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So from my understanding you need a singleton which is:

  1. Short, easy to implement/understand.
  2. Only initialized when doProcess is called.

I suggest the following implementation using a nested class:

public class Processor {
    private Date startTime;

    private static class Nested {
        public static final Date date = new Date();
    }

    public void doProcess() {
        startTime = Nested.date; // initialized on first reference
        // do somethings
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is nice but I want decrease my LOC(line of code) ;) I up-vote to this. –  MJM Jul 25 '12 at 12:55
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1 What you have used is known as double checked locking.

2. There are another 2 ways to do it

  - Use synchronized on the Method
  - Initialize the static variable during declaration.

3. As you want an example with No if and synchronized keyword, i am showing you the Initialize the static variable during declaration. way.

public class MyClass{

  private static MyClass unique = new MyClass();

  private MyClass{}

  public static MyClass getInstance(){

      return unique;

  }

 }
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