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On the page I have an one query, which is bring page loading speed down.

SELECT * FROM users1 WHERE user_id NOT IN (SELECT user_id FROM users2)

USERS1 is the table with all users of the site, a lot of data. USERS2 is the table of following eachother users.

So, I need to select some users, which is not alredy following.

Any ways of optimisation?

I'm posting real query:

SELECT users.*
FROM (
    SELECT user_id
    FROM users
    WHERE user_id!=156 AND user_id NOT IN (
        SELECT follower_id
        FROM following
        WHERE user_id=156
    ) ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 2
) AS temp
JOIN users ON users.user_id = temp.user_id;

Indexes on user_id fields.

Query took 0.0912 sec

This query works not bad on the testing server with less data, but it takes up to 3 seconds on live one.

share|improve this question
1  
Learn about SQL joins; and ensure you have indexes on the user_id columns. –  eggyal Jul 25 '12 at 12:21

3 Answers 3

LEFT JOIN way:

SELECT *
FROM users1
LEFT JOIN users2 ON users1.user_id = users2.user_id
WHERE users2.user_id IS NULL

NOT EXISTS way:

SELECT *
FROM users1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM users2 WHERE users1.user_id = users2.user_id)

Working examples: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/611f2/1

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1  
Out of curiousity: Can you cite why this is supposed to be a faster implementation of an anti-join in MySQL? In a more sophisticated database (e.g. Oracle), I wouldn't expect there to be a relevant performance difference, due to effective query transformation... –  Lukas Eder Jul 25 '12 at 12:26
    
Since when MySQL is a sophisticated database? :) These queries may or may not be faster. OP is encouraged to use/interpret the EXPLAIN command. –  biziclop Jul 25 '12 at 12:28
1  
@LukasEder: Agreed. Quassnoi's analysis reaches the same conclusion. –  eggyal Jul 25 '12 at 12:28
    
@eggyal: That seems to be a good resource... Yet it's crazy to have to do that kind of fine-tuning manually. I'm glad I live in Oracle-land... :-) –  Lukas Eder Jul 25 '12 at 12:28

You should use LEFT JOIN for best performance as:

SELECT a.* 
FROM users1 a
     LEFT JOIN users2 b
        ON a.user_id = b.user_id
WHERE b.user_id IS NULL;

Also have a look at Visual explanation of joins

share|improve this answer
1  
Out of curiousity: Can you cite why this is supposed to be a faster implementation of an anti-join in MySQL? In a more sophisticated database (e.g. Oracle), I wouldn't expect there to be a relevant performance difference, due to effective query transformation... –  Lukas Eder Jul 25 '12 at 12:26
    
@LukasEder: Agreed. Quassnoi's analysis reaches the same conclusion. –  eggyal Jul 25 '12 at 12:28

This should do the trick:

SELECT users1.* FROM users1
LEFT JOIN users2 on users1.user_id=users2.user_id
WHERE users2.user_id IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
WHERE NOT IN ... –  eggyal Jul 25 '12 at 12:22

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