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I am using this code to test if an object is null or empty:

var isNullOrEmpty = function(obj) {
    // this should handle if someone defines a variable named 'undefined'. 
    if(obj == null || typeof(obj) == 'undefined' || obj == "") {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Is there anything I'm missing?

Thanks.

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Jul 26 '12 at 14:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
For strict comparisons like this, you should be using the identity operator, i.e. proper usage of === versus ==. –  Alex Jul 25 '12 at 13:57
    
Isn't if (obj) more or less equivalent to what you're trying to do here? –  Waleed Khan Jul 25 '12 at 13:57
    
You have to tell us what it means for a variable to be "empty". –  Felix Kling Jul 25 '12 at 14:00
    
There is really no need for a isNullOrEmpty function. I recommend the reading How Good C# Habits can Encourage Bad JavaScript Habits, by Elijah Manor. It helps a lot to learn and love JavaScript. –  Bruno Schäpper Jul 25 '12 at 14:01
1  
You don't need to test for null and undefined separately: obj==null will evaluate as true for both null and undefined. If you need to test them separately use ===. Also, if you're testing an "object" to see if it's empty does that mean [] or {} should be considered "empty"? –  nnnnnn Jul 25 '12 at 14:02

3 Answers 3

I'd use this:

var isNullOrEmpty = function(obj) {
    if((!obj && obj!==false) || !(obj.length>0)) {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

!obj includes:

  • obj = 0 (if you want to return false, just add this condition: && obj!==0)
  • obj = ""
  • obj = undefined
  • obj = null
  • obj = false

obj.length includes:

  • obj = ""
  • obj = []

You can also check if the object is a plain object ({}) with this function:

var isPlainObj = function(obj){
    for(var i in obj)
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(i))
            return false;
    return true;
}
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!obj is true for: obj is undefined, obj = false, obj = 0, obj = '' –  cuzzea Jul 25 '12 at 14:00
    
Yes, isn't it what the op wants? –  Danilo Valente Jul 25 '12 at 14:02
    
length is undefined if it's an object –  Christoph Jul 25 '12 at 14:02
    
isPlainObj needs a check hasOwnProperty or it will check the prototype-chain –  Christoph Jul 25 '12 at 14:06
1  
@cuzzea you're right about the bool. And I've added the isPlainObj function exactly because !{} is false –  Danilo Valente Jul 25 '12 at 14:14
var isNullOrEmpty = function(obj) {
    return (typeof obj === 'undefined' || obj === null || obj === '');
}

The order of operations are short circuited, meaning if the first expression evaluates to true then the rest are ignored. Moving the typeof first makes sure the obj has been defined before testing it's value for null or a string. Also upgraded the comparison operator to strict.

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You don't need to test if it's been defined before testing for null, so re-ordering those conditions really doesn't make any difference. (When invoking the function if the parameter passed in is a variable name that has not been defined it will crash with a ReferenceError before it gets into the function.) –  nnnnnn Jul 25 '12 at 14:10

You might need to handle the case where a String contains only whitespace. I do it like

str.replace(/\s/g, "") !== "";

so something like

if (obj === null || 
    obj.length || 
    ("" + obj).replace(/\s/g, "") === "")
   return true;
share|improve this answer
    
Won't the (obj.length && obj.length === 0) part always be false? If the .length actually is 0 then obj.length will be falsy... –  nnnnnn Jul 25 '12 at 14:18
    
yep, thanx for pointing that out. –  hvgotcodes Jul 25 '12 at 14:25

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