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I have a text file with users IDs.

userA userB userC etc This text file changes every day depending on what is required.

Q, How do I use powershell to return certain attributes from the users in the text file? What I am looking for is

userID, Email address, SIP, ExchangeServer, StorageGroup, Database, LegacyExchangeDN etc....

All help is appreciated...

Thanks Bunnioch

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jul 25 '12 at 14:12

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

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My vote to close is to migrate this to StackOverflow. I think that's a better forum for this type of question. –  GlenH7 Jul 25 '12 at 13:36
    
Agree with GlenH7, but while we're waiting: where are the attributes to be found? Active Directory? A database? The same text file? –  pdr Jul 25 '12 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

so assuming you have a text file called test.txt like this

1,bob,QA
2,Fred,Dev
3.John,IT
11,rob,dev

you can use select-string to easily grab information

 PS C:\Users\Adam\Documents> Select-String 2 test.txt

 test.txt:2:2,Fred,Dev

But this has some limitations since the pattern is a regex if we use 1 we would match two records

PS C:\Users\Adam\Documents> Select-String 1 test.txt

test.txt:1:1,bob,QA
test.txt:4:11,rob,dev

This can be resolved with more complicated regular expressions but another option is to utilize where-object in conjunction with get-content and provide a conditon

get-content test.txt| where-object {$_.split(",")[0] -eq 1 }

in this case I have read each line and evaluated the line by splitting it and then comparing the first element

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The attributes will be found in AD. –  bunnioch Jul 25 '12 at 20:50

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