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I need to record the number of items requested and issued against each item every day. The purchase_doc table is:

purchase_doc table

The requested_items table contains item requested as follows:

requested_items

The movement table contains item requested as follows:

movement

The need output (data to be inserted) is:

data_to_insert

One way of doing this is to fetch items issued and requested from the first 2 queries, and then build an array of items issued and requested against each item id, and then insert these values in the daily_movement table, like this:

SELECT n.item_id AS n__item_id, SUM(n.qty) AS qty
FROM requested_items n LEFT JOIN purchase_doc doc ON n.doc_id = doc.id 
WHERE (doc.type = 'Item Request' AND doc.created_at > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)) 
GROUP BY n.item_id

SELECT n.item_id AS item_id, SUM(n.qty) AS qty
FROM movement n LEFT JOIN purchase_doc doc ON n.doc_id = doc.id 
WHERE (doc.type = 'Store Issue' AND doc.created_at > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)) 
GROUP BY n.item_id

From these and other SELECTs, I need to insert a single row per item per day containing the qty of requests, issues, etc for this item in this fashion:

INSERT INTO daily_movement date, item_id, requested_qty, issued_qty VALUES ( NOW(), 23, 4, 5), ( NOW(), 25, 5, 5), ( NOW(), 113, 6, 8);

But there will be too many SELECTs (since I also need other activities performed per item), followed by an insert.

My question is: Is it possible to do this via a single SELECT ... INSERT statement. If not, can somebody suggest a more elegant way of doing this

share|improve this question
    
Can you show how the fields you retrieve in the first two SELECTs relate to the fields in the INSERT? –  DaveRandom Jul 25 '12 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm thinking this, but it might be over-simplified:

INSERT INTO `daily_movement`
  (`date`, `item_id`, `requested_qty`, `issued_qty`)
SELECT NOW(), `r`.`item_id`, SUM(`r`.`qty`), SUM(`m`.`qty`)
  FROM `purchase_doc` `d`
  JOIN `requested_items` `r`
    ON `r`.`doc_id` = `d`.`id`
  LEFT JOIN `movement` `m`
    ON `m`.`doc_id` = `d`.`id`
WHERE
    (`d`.`type` = 'Item Request' OR `d`.`type` = 'Store Issue')
  AND
    `d`.`created_at` > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
GROUP BY `r`.`item_id`

EDIT

This is my final answer, with a nasty UNION to get around MySQL's lack of FULL OUTER JOIN:

INSERT INTO `daily_movement`
  (`date`, `item_id`, `week_no`, `requested_qty`, `issued_qty`)
SELECT *
FROM (
  (
    SELECT COALESCE(`r`.`item_id`, `a`.`item_id`) AS `item_id`, CURDATE() AS `date`, NULL AS `week_no`, SUM(`r`.`qty`) AS `requests`, COALESCE(`a`.`issued`, 0) AS `issued`
    FROM `purchase_doc` `d`
    LEFT JOIN `requested_items` `r`
      ON `r`.`doc_id` = `d`.`id` 
    LEFT JOIN (
      SELECT `m`.`item_id`, SUM(`m`.`qty`) AS `issued`
      FROM `purchase_doc` `d`
      JOIN `movement` `m`
        ON `m`.`doc_id` = `d`.`id` 
      WHERE `d`.`type` = 'Store Issue'
        AND `d`.`created_at` > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
      GROUP BY `m`.`item_id`
    ) `a`
      ON `a`.`item_id` = `r`.`item_id`
    WHERE `d`.`type` = 'Material Requisition'
      AND `d`.`created_at` > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
    GROUP BY `r`.`item_id`
  ) UNION DISTINCT (
    SELECT COALESCE(`m`.`item_id`, `a`.`item_id`) AS `item_id`, CURDATE() AS `date`, NULL AS `week_no`, COALESCE(`a`.`requests`, 0) AS `requests`, SUM(`m`.`qty`) AS `issued`
    FROM `purchase_doc` `d`
    LEFT JOIN `movement` `m`
      ON `m`.`doc_id` = `d`.`id` 
    LEFT JOIN (
      SELECT `r`.`item_id`, SUM(`r`.`qty`) AS `requests`
      FROM `purchase_doc` `d`
      JOIN `requested_items` `r`
        ON `r`.`doc_id` = `d`.`id` 
      WHERE `d`.`type` = 'Material Requisition'
        AND `d`.`created_at` > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
      GROUP BY `r`.`item_id`
    ) `a`
      ON `a`.`item_id` = `m`.`item_id`
    WHERE `d`.`type` = 'Store Issue'
      AND `d`.`created_at` > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
    GROUP BY `m`.`item_id`
  )
  ORDER BY `item_id`
) `u`

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/3923d/13

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn'k work. This way, I can only pick up values from either requested_items or movement tables. and the qty from the other table will get aggregated. The r.item_id in SELECT AND GROUP BY clause are creating the problem –  qais Jul 26 '12 at 13:09
    
+1 as it's quite close to what I want. If requested_items or movement were a single table, it would have worked. Please see if you can correct this query to get the desired result –  qais Jul 26 '12 at 13:29
    
@qais Sorry I don't quite follow what your problem is. Can you show some sample data from the three tables, the result this gives you at the moment and the result you want instead? –  DaveRandom Jul 26 '12 at 15:35
1  
@qais OK right, try this. It certainly produces the result set you want based on the data above, but I'm not sure whether it will work for every situation - to be honest I've been staring at it and fudging it about for so long I can't visualise it properly any more. I might pick it up and re-check it in the morning. Obviously that is a SELECT that demonstrates the result set that will be retrieved, you can easily add INSERT INTO above it for the actual query you execute. –  DaveRandom Jul 26 '12 at 22:16
1  
@qais OK I've woken up this morning and immediately realised what I don't like about this. What is really required here is a FULL OUTER JOIN between the outer query and the derived table of the inner query. As it is, any item_ids that produce a non-null result in the inner query but do not match that outer query (i.e. have a non-zero value for issued and a zero-value for requests) will not appear in the results. Unfortunately (and ridiculously) MySQL does not support full joins, you would have to union a left join with a right outer join, which makes this much less efficient. –  DaveRandom Jul 27 '12 at 7:48

you can use the union operator here or here to get all your results in a single select

share|improve this answer
    
UNION won't help with an INSERT ... SELECT. You need to JOIN the rows, not get more of them. –  DaveRandom Jul 25 '12 at 14:50

You can use a query like this -

edited:

INSERT INTO daily_movement(date, item_id, requested_qty, issued_qty)
SELECT i.item_id, SUM(ri.qty) requested_qty, SUM(m.qty) issued_qty FROM
  (SELECT item_id FROM requested_items UNION SELECT item_id FROM movement) i
  LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT n.item_id, n.qty
    FROM requested_items n LEFT JOIN purchase_doc doc ON n.doc_id = doc.id 
    WHERE doc.type = 'Item Request' AND doc.created_at > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
  ) ri
  ON ri.item_id = i.item_id
  LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT n.item_id, n.qty
    FROM movement n LEFT JOIN purchase_doc doc ON n.doc_id = doc.id 
    WHERE doc.type = 'Store Issue' AND doc.created_at > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
  ) m
  ON m.item_id = i.item_id
GROUP BY
  i.item_id;
share|improve this answer
    
You didn't include the movement table anywhere –  DaveRandom Jul 25 '12 at 14:59
    
@DaveRandom Agree, I'll check it. –  Devart Jul 25 '12 at 15:09
    
Doesn'k work. Doesn't insert anything. The select statement alone (excluding the INSERT) gives incorrect output –  qais Jul 26 '12 at 13:25

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