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Is it possible to get "type of the current struct" inside of the struct? For example, I want to do something like this:

struct foobar {
  int x, y;

  bool operator==(const THIS_TYPE& other) const  /*  What should I put here instead of THIS_TYPE? */
  {
    return x==other.x && y==other.y;
  }
}

I tried to do it this way:

struct foobar {
  int x, y;

  template<typename T>
  bool operator==(const T& t) const
  {
    decltype (*this)& other = t; /* We can use `this` here, so we can get "current type"*/
    return x==other.x && y==other.y;
  }
}

but it looks ugly, requires support of the latest C++ Standard, and MSVC connot compile it (it crashes with "an internal error").

Actually, I just want to write some preprocessor macros to auto-generate functions like operator==:

struct foobar {
  int x, y;
  GEN_COMPARE_FUNC(x, y);
}

struct some_info {
  double len;
  double age;
  int rank;
  GEN_COMPARE_FUNC(len, age, rank);
}

But I need to know "current type" inside of the macro.

share|improve this question
1  
Why not just make your macro GEN_COMPARE_FUNC(foobar, x, y) instead? –  Rollie Jul 25 '12 at 15:02
    
@ForEveR via Variadic Macros. It's supported by GCC and MSVC, so it's enough for me. –  qehgt Jul 25 '12 at 15:02
    
By using a templated bool operator==, you may accidentally make it possible to compare two types where it doesn't make sense for them to be comparable. –  Emile Cormier Jul 25 '12 at 15:03
    
@Rollie, You're right, it can be implemented this way, of course. But I need to check that there is no other solutions. –  qehgt Jul 25 '12 at 15:06
1  
I think the closest you can get is by typedefing a 'curType' in each class you want to use the macros in, so typedef foobar curType;, and then in the macros, bool operator==(const curType & _rhs) const {...} –  Rollie Jul 25 '12 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

Actually, you can use somethink like this.

#define GEN_COMPARE_FUNC(type, x, y)\
template<typename type>\
bool operator ==(const type& t) const\
{\
    return this->x == t.x && this->y == t.y;\
}

struct Foo
{
    int x, y;
    GEN_COMPARE_FUNC(Foo, x, y);
};

I have no idea, how use var. macro-pars in this way (we need to go throw the params and compare each par from this and from t, i have no idea, how expand params in macro).

share|improve this answer

This stack-overflow URL states that the boost libraries can compute the type of an expression, but C/C++ by itself cannot:

Getting name and type of a struct field from its object

Someone asked a similar question also:

How can I add reflection to a C++ application?

To start using typeof include the typeof header:

#include <boost/typeof/typeof.hpp>

To deduce the type of an expression at compile time use the BOOST_TYPEOF macro:

namespace ex1
{
    typedef BOOST_TYPEOF(1 + 0.5) type;

    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT((is_same<type, double>::value));
}
share|improve this answer
    
C++11 can. typedef decltype(1 + 0.5) type; –  ForEveR Jul 26 '12 at 5:42

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