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I need to execute functionality whereby if the user is going to close the window (or perform some other action) without saving their changes, they are going to be informed with a message box.

In order to be able to do this, I need to be able to know whether changes have been made to the object in question since the window was opened.

I'm thinking a way to do this is to create a copy of the object when the window loads and keep it as _original and then before the window closes I can compare it against the object that may or may not have been changed.

What is the best way to copy the object into _original, without both of them simply having a reference to the same place in memory?

Also, what is the best way to compare the two objects after, to see if the object is different than _original?

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If this is an instance of an object within your code behind, then you would need to implement IClonable and IComparable so that you can a) clone the object and then b) implement your own comparison code. –  Gavin Jul 25 '12 at 14:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could implement your object in a way where it maintains a modified state e.g.

public class StatefulObject
{
    private string _propertyOne;

    public StatefulObject()
    {
        this.Modified = false;
    }

    public string PropertyOne
    {
        get { return this._propertyOne; }
        set
        {
            if (this._propertyOne != value)
            {
                this._propertyOne = value;
                this.Modified = true;
            }
        }
    }

    public bool Modified { get; private set; }
}

This would need some extra work like determining when your just initializing the object (unless you restrict it to the constructor only), however, you get the idea.

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A useful addition would be a _propertyOneOriginal value so an "undo" would work without stating the property had changed. –  Austin Salonen Jul 25 '12 at 15:03
    
@AustinSalonen Doesn't look like the OP is looking for something as in-depth as that, but yeah would be a nice addition. Or even something a bit more flexible Dictionary<string, object> _changeHistory where you could maintain a list of property names and their previous values (essentially mementos). –  James Jul 25 '12 at 15:08

You could serialize the object using BinaryFormatter and then deserialize it back:

public static string Serialize<T>(T instance)
{
    var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
    using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        formatter.Serialize(stream, instance);
        return Convert.ToBase64String(stream.ToArray());
    }
}

public static T Deserialize<T>(string serialized)
{
    var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
    using (var stream = new MemoryStream(Convert.FromBase64String(serialized)))
    {
        return (T)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
    }
}
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Implement ICloneable its a simple way to do a shallow copy (assuming your object isnt too complicated) Then you can use IComparable or IEquatable depending on how you want to check they are different or just that they are different.

If you want a better answer then you need to be a bit more specific.

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I think that comparing objects is not the best solution. I'd suggest to observe the window itself. NotifyPropertyChanged will be the best if you use properties in your window logic.

http://www.dreamincode.net/forums/topic/208833-using-the-inotifypropertychanged-functionality/

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It may be overkill but I would implement the icloneable and icomparable. As for creating the copies if the object is simple memberwiseclone is always an option. If the object is a nested udt you would have to continue the idom down to simple types, but I have found for unit testing this to be helpfully any way.

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