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When I build a site, I'd like to have at least one browser I can show it off in without any hacks or workarounds, and yet still retain maximum functionality. Knowing that none of the browsers have perfect standards adherence, which one comes closest?

Also, are there any standards areas in which a single browser seems to specialize? Opera, for instance, seems to be bent on adhering to all voice-related CSS standards.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Safari using the latest WebKit nightly build.

Not that any browser in the world uses this yet (not even Chrome) but if all you're worried about is standards then that's your best bet - it passes Acid3, something no browser on the market can do yet.

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Acid3, my, my. Seems like I should WebKit directly in the test stable, rather than as a post-build tweak. –  Dustman Sep 22 '08 at 19:05

The way most people I know work is to run Firefox(with Firebug) and develop in that. Firebug is an invaluable tool for debugging. They will usually take what the get there and try to squeak it into IE and other browsers. Not exactly the answer to your question (Its not 100% compliant but its close), but hopefully it helps.

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Firefox is not as strict to web standards compared to webkit, there are situations where you can send a malformed tag and firefox will fix it without tell you while webkit will either breakdown or send you errors via the console. –  Shard Mar 2 '10 at 22:28
    
Yeah that response came from 20 days after the first release of the Chrome beta for windows. Safari had been around for a while, but I still don't personally enjoy using it. I have to say I mostly use Chrome now. –  Steve g Mar 5 '10 at 18:31

This is an excellent question, but I find it hard to give a single answer. Traditionally, Opera has been the most standards compliant. For a long time, it was the ONLY browser to pass the ACID2 test in fact. FireFox and IE haven't been able to claim that (although supposedly IE8 is supposed to fix that, and FF is working on it all the time).

That having been said however, bear mind that IE has the largest "market share" of all the browsers right now (businesses have ties to MS, and Windows always comes with IE out of the box) followed closely by FireFox. So if your goal is to show off your app in a browser that most people will be using, it'll have to be one of those.

Purists will tell you that FF is more standards compliant than IE7 (and they are right), so that you should design for that and not IE. I can tell from many years as a designer/developer that pages taking that approach may not be a great idea. Bear in mind again - IE has the market share, and usually where it counts. So if it looks great in FF but breaks in IE, most users will be very upset, and the same vice-versa.

Best compromise - concentrate on those two. Tweak it to look right in at least FF AND IE, and now you've covered 90%+ of the people that will be using your website.

Don't get me wrong here - I'm not trying to dismiss the users of Opera, Safari, or any other browser. But if you want the most results for the least amount of work, then there ya go.

Best answer - take your time, do it right, test ALL the major browsers. The time spent working through these browser headaches ahead of time (when you can do it at your own pace) will be well rewarded. Compare that to the screaming client who wants to know why your page breaks in his favorite browser, and wants it fixed today. :)

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Opera comes closest to standards compliance.

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Do you have a reference for this? –  Runscope API Tools Sep 22 '08 at 18:31
    
A reference: w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_opera.asp –  Toon Krijthe Sep 22 '08 at 18:33
    
Uh, WebKit and Opera finished at about the same time. Technically, WebKit beat Opera. –  Jeremy Banks Sep 23 '08 at 0:05

"When I build a site, I'd like to have at least one browser I can show it off in without any hacks or workarounds, and yet still retain maximum functionality."

If you are testing your site, you would be better served to choose target browsers based on your users' needs.

Unless you are in a position where you can force your users to change to a particular browser, you need to test your site in whatever browser(s) they use.

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I use Firefox with IE tab and chrome. Firefox with IE tab because those are the two browsers with the most market share and chrome because it is one of the few windows browsers that use webkit, meaning it should display similarly to safari.

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I highly recommend IE Tab. If you are using firefox and want to be able to easily check what the page looks like in IE this is a massive time saver - just right-click on the tab ans select "switch rendering enginge" –  Dr8k Sep 23 '08 at 0:21

The way most people I know work is to run Firefox(with Firebug) and develop in that. Firebug is an invaluable tool for debugging. They will usually take what the get there and try to squeak it into IE and other browsers. Not exactly the answer to your question (Its not 100% compliant but its close), but hopefully it helps.

+1 - I prefer firefox for most browsing as I find it most stable and easiest to use, but when it comes to web development it takes the cake when combined with firebug! The others are good for testing, but I find that firefox+firebug makes everything so much easier to use

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In that vein, IE8 Beta 2 has a MUCH improved developer toolbar built in (hit F12) that is a pretty good imitation of Firebug. Not perfect but it's really useful when you really need to debug in IE (it lets you emulate IE7 as well) and especially now that Firebug is unstable at the moment. –  Schnapple Sep 22 '08 at 18:24
    
Safari and Chrome also have pretty nice developer features out of the box. –  conmulligan Sep 23 '08 at 0:07

Don't just use a standards compliant browser, use other tools such as the w3c validator.

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Validators confirm that your code is legal, not that it's says what you think it does. –  Jeremy Banks Sep 23 '08 at 0:07
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Yes. While browsers only tell you that your code does what you think it does IN THAT BROWSER, but not necessarily whether it's legal. Which is why you need both. –  Wedge Sep 23 '08 at 0:11

Try Google Chrome it uses the WebKit which is feature complete for the latest standards.

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Chrome is not up-to-date with WebKit. The last time I checked, Chrome was scoring something like a 73 on Acid3, whereas WebKit nightlies and internal Opera builds have been passing for quite some time. –  Hank Gay Sep 22 '08 at 18:45

I used to use Opera and Firefox as my "Standards Compliant" browsers, but I've recently become much enamored with Safari. The WebKit under the hood is really solid, the javascript is really fast (or fast enough, anyway), and and the CSS support is pretty excellent. It's not perfect, but does a really solid job of doing what it's supposed to do.

Also, it has the greatest print-screen feature I've ever seen in a browser. Seriously. Whereas every other browser seems to really munge up any screen I try to print, Safari always seems to get it right. A minor thing, but worth major points in my book.

Edited to add: Chrome is coming close to taking Safari's place, but that print screen thing is still the deciding factor. Being able to just hit "print" during a meeting with a client and not have to fiddle with any settings to get it working right is a major relief.

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I find that if you stick to standards compliant markup, and don't use anything too unusual, it will render fine in Firefox 2/3 and Safari/Chrome (and usually fine in IE7/8). If not, you're probably better off trying to simplify your markup, rather than introducing hacks and workarounds.

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