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Supposte I have two Python dictionaries - dictA and dictB. I need to find out if there are any keys which are present in dictB but not in dictA. Which is the fastest way to go about it. Should I convert the dictionary keys into a set and then go about..

Interested in knowing your thoughts...


Thanks for your responses.

Apologies for not stating my question properly. My scenario is like this - I have a dictA which can be the same as dictB or may have some keys missing as compared to dictB or else the value of some keys might be different which has to be set to that of dictA key's value.

Problem is the dictionary has no standard and can have keys which can be dict of dict....

Say

dictA={'key1':a, 'key2':b, 'key3':{'key11':cc, 'key12':dd}, 'key4':{'key111':{....}}}
dictB={'key1':a, 'key2:':newb, 'key3':{'key11':cc, 'key12':newdd, 'key13':ee}.......

So 'key2' value has to be reset to the new value and 'key13' has to be added inside the dict. The key value does not have a fixed format. It can be a simple value or a dict or a dict of dict....

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11 Answers

You can use set operations on the keys:

diff = set(dictb.keys()) - set(dicta.keys())

Here is a class to find all the possibilities: what was added, what was removed, which key-value pairs are the same, and which key-value pairs are changed.

class DictDiffer(object):
    """
    Calculate the difference between two dictionaries as:
    (1) items added
    (2) items removed
    (3) keys same in both but changed values
    (4) keys same in both and unchanged values
    """
    def __init__(self, current_dict, past_dict):
        self.current_dict, self.past_dict = current_dict, past_dict
        self.set_current, self.set_past = set(current_dict.keys()), set(past_dict.keys())
        self.intersect = self.set_current.intersection(self.set_past)
    def added(self):
        return self.set_current - self.intersect 
    def removed(self):
        return self.set_past - self.intersect 
    def changed(self):
        return set(o for o in self.intersect if self.past_dict[o] != self.current_dict[o])
    def unchanged(self):
        return set(o for o in self.intersect if self.past_dict[o] == self.current_dict[o])

Here is some sample output:

>>> a = {'a': 1, 'b': 1, 'c': 0}
>>> b = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'd': 0}
>>> d = DictDiffer(b, a)
>>> print "Added:", d.added()
Added: set(['d'])
>>> print "Removed:", d.removed()
Removed: set(['c'])
>>> print "Changed:", d.changed()
Changed: set(['b'])
>>> print "Unchanged:", d.unchanged()
Unchanged: set(['a'])

Available as a github repo: https://github.com/hughdbrown/dictdiffer

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Thanks, this is exactly what I needed. –  xaralis Apr 26 '11 at 7:43
    
Smart solution, thanks! I've made it work with nested dicts by checking whether changed or unchanged values are dict instances and calling a recursive function to check them again using your class. –  AJJ Dec 12 '12 at 12:24
    
@AJJ: Open-sourced the code on github: github.com/hughdbrown/dictdiffer Let the pull requests begin! –  hughdbrown Jan 14 '13 at 20:33
1  
@urschrei: AJJ submitted a github pull request for this github.com/hughdbrown/dictdiffer/pull/3. I have not gotten around to reviewing it yet. You could take his implementation if you weren't willing to wait on me: github.com/ajweb/dictdiffer. –  hughdbrown Apr 23 '13 at 13:14
1  
How about a def update(self, new_dict): self.__init__(new_dict, self.current_dict) or the like so you can do a rolling comparison –  Nick T Oct 21 '13 at 20:02
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As Alex Martelli wrote, if you simply want to check if any key in B is not in A, any(True for k in dictB if k not in dictA) would be the way to go.

To find the keys that are missing:

diff = set(dictB)-set(dictA) #sets

C:\Dokumente und Einstellungen\thc>python -m timeit -s "dictA =    
dict(zip(range(1000),range
(1000))); dictB = dict(zip(range(0,2000,2),range(1000)))" "diff=set(dictB)-set(dictA)"
10000 loops, best of 3: 107 usec per loop

diff = [ k for k in dictB if k not in dictA ] #lc

C:\Dokumente und Einstellungen\thc>python -m timeit -s "dictA = 
dict(zip(range(1000),range
(1000))); dictB = dict(zip(range(0,2000,2),range(1000)))" "diff=[ k for k in dictB if
k not in dictA ]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 95.9 usec per loop

So those two solutions are pretty much the same speed.

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4  
This makes more sense: any(k not in dictA for k in dictB) –  hughdbrown May 2 '11 at 10:07
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not sure whether its "fast" or not, but normally, one can do this

dicta = {"a":1,"b":2,"c":3,"d":4}
dictb = {"a":1,"d":2}
for key in dicta.keys():
    if not key in dictb:
        print key
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You have to swap dicta and dictb since he wants to know those keys of dictb that are not in dicta. –  Gumbo Jul 22 '09 at 13:51
    
thanks. i am bad with english :) –  ghostdog74 Jul 22 '09 at 14:07
    
very helpful answer as it provides the raw key. Much appreciated. –  dwstein Aug 9 '12 at 16:35
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If you really mean exactly what you say (that you only need to find out IF "there are any keys" in B and not in A, not WHICH ONES might those be if any), the fastest way should be:

if any(True for k in dictB if k not in dictA): ...

If you actually need to find out WHICH KEYS, if any, are in B and not in A, and not just "IF" there are such keys, then existing answers are quite appropriate (but I do suggest more precision in future questions if that's indeed what you mean;-).

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This will not work if there's a key in B that's not in A and it evaluates to False. For example: a = {}; b = {'': 'sample'}; any(k for k in b if k not in a) –  Steve Losh Jul 22 '09 at 16:51
2  
any(True for k in b if k not in a) –  Jochen Ritzel Jul 22 '09 at 16:58
    
@THC4k Yep, that's likely the best way. –  Steve Losh Jul 22 '09 at 17:05
    
Good points @Steve and @thc4k, thanks - editing the answer to fix my bug now. –  Alex Martelli Jul 23 '09 at 0:23
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There is an other question in stackoverflow about this argument and i have to admit that there is a simple solution explained: the datadiff library of python helps printing the difference between two dictionaries.

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If on Python ≥ 2.7:

# update different values in dictB
# I would assume only dictA should be updated,
# but the question specifies otherwise

for k in dictA.viewkeys() & dictB.viewkeys():
    if dictA[k] != dictB[k]:
        dictB[k]= dictA[k]

# add missing keys to dictA

dictA.update( (k,dictB[k]) for k in dictB.viewkeys() - dictA.viewkeys() )
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Here's a way that will work, allows for keys that evaluate to False, and still uses a generator expression to fall out early if possible. It's not exceptionally pretty though.

any(map(lambda x: True, (k for k in b if k not in a)))

EDIT:

THC4k posted a reply to my comment on another answer. Here's a better, prettier way to do the above:

any(True for k in b if k not in a)

Not sure how that never crossed my mind...

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what about standart (compare FULL Object)

PyDev->new PyDev Module->Module: unittest

import unittest


class Test(unittest.TestCase):


    def testName(self):
        obj1 = {1:1, 2:2}
        obj2 = {1:1, 2:2}
        self.maxDiff = None # sometimes is usefull
        self.assertDictEqual(d1, d2)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    #import sys;sys.argv = ['', 'Test.testName']

    unittest.main()
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This is an old question and asks a little bit less than what I needed so this answer actually solves more than this question asks. The answers in this question helped me solve the following:

  1. (asked) Record differences between two dictionaries
  2. Merge differences from #1 into base dictionary
  3. (asked) Merge differences between two dictionaries (treat dictionary #2 as if it were a diff dictionary)
  4. Try to detect item movements as well as changes
  5. (asked) Do all of this recursively

All this combined with JSON makes for a pretty powerful configuration storage support.

The solution (also on github):

from collections import OrderedDict
from pprint import pprint


class izipDestinationMatching(object):
    __slots__ = ("attr", "value", "index")

    def __init__(self, attr, value, index):
        self.attr, self.value, self.index = attr, value, index

    def __repr__(self):
        return "izip_destination_matching: found match by '%s' = '%s' @ %d" % (self.attr, self.value, self.index)


def izip_destination(a, b, attrs, addMarker=True):
    """
    Returns zipped lists, but final size is equal to b with (if shorter) a padded with nulls
    Additionally also tries to find item reallocations by searching child dicts (if they are dicts) for attribute, listed in attrs)
    When addMarker == False (patching), final size will be the longer of a, b
    """
    for idx, item in enumerate(b):
        try:
            attr = next((x for x in attrs if x in item), None)  # See if the item has any of the ID attributes
            match, matchIdx = next(((orgItm, idx) for idx, orgItm in enumerate(a) if attr in orgItm and orgItm[attr] == item[attr]), (None, None)) if attr else (None, None)
            if match and matchIdx != idx and addMarker: item[izipDestinationMatching] = izipDestinationMatching(attr, item[attr], matchIdx)
        except:
            match = None
        yield (match if match else a[idx] if len(a) > idx else None), item
    if not addMarker and len(a) > len(b):
        for item in a[len(b) - len(a):]:
            yield item, item


def dictdiff(a, b, searchAttrs=[]):
    """
    returns a dictionary which represents difference from a to b
    the return dict is as short as possible:
      equal items are removed
      added / changed items are listed
      removed items are listed with value=None
    Also processes list values where the resulting list size will match that of b.
    It can also search said list items (that are dicts) for identity values to detect changed positions.
      In case such identity value is found, it is kept so that it can be re-found during the merge phase
    @param a: original dict
    @param b: new dict
    @param searchAttrs: list of strings (keys to search for in sub-dicts)
    @return: dict / list / whatever input is
    """
    if not (isinstance(a, dict) and isinstance(b, dict)):
        if isinstance(a, list) and isinstance(b, list):
            return [dictdiff(v1, v2, searchAttrs) for v1, v2 in izip_destination(a, b, searchAttrs)]
        return b
    res = OrderedDict()
    if izipDestinationMatching in b:
        keepKey = b[izipDestinationMatching].attr
        del b[izipDestinationMatching]
    else:
        keepKey = izipDestinationMatching
    for key in sorted(set(a.keys() + b.keys())):
        v1 = a.get(key, None)
        v2 = b.get(key, None)
        if keepKey == key or v1 != v2: res[key] = dictdiff(v1, v2, searchAttrs)
    if len(res) <= 1: res = dict(res)  # This is only here for pretty print (OrderedDict doesn't pprint nicely)
    return res


def dictmerge(a, b, searchAttrs=[]):
    """
    Returns a dictionary which merges differences recorded in b to base dictionary a
    Also processes list values where the resulting list size will match that of a
    It can also search said list items (that are dicts) for identity values to detect changed positions
    @param a: original dict
    @param b: diff dict to patch into a
    @param searchAttrs: list of strings (keys to search for in sub-dicts)
    @return: dict / list / whatever input is
    """
    if not (isinstance(a, dict) and isinstance(b, dict)):
        if isinstance(a, list) and isinstance(b, list):
            return [dictmerge(v1, v2, searchAttrs) for v1, v2 in izip_destination(a, b, searchAttrs, False)]
        return b
    res = OrderedDict()
    for key in sorted(set(a.keys() + b.keys())):
        v1 = a.get(key, None)
        v2 = b.get(key, None)
        #print "processing", key, v1, v2, key not in b, dictmerge(v1, v2)
        if v2 is not None: res[key] = dictmerge(v1, v2, searchAttrs)
        elif key not in b: res[key] = v1
    if len(res) <= 1: res = dict(res)  # This is only here for pretty print (OrderedDict doesn't pprint nicely)
    return res
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May not 100% fit your question - but you could dump the dictionaries to json and compare the resulting strings. ;-)

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Do you have an example to achieve that? –  ForceMagic Nov 11 '12 at 6:41
    
why json? Just convert them to strings. isequal = lambda (a, b): unicode(a)==unicode(b) –  speedplane Feb 9 '13 at 22:05
    
@speedlane: Would be cool, but you forgot that dictonaries are not sorted and keys can be anywhere, in any order... –  Luc Stepniewski Dec 24 '13 at 13:05
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Not sure if it is still relevant but I came across this problem, my situation i just needed to return a dictionary of the changes for all nested dictionaries etc etc. Could not find a good solution out there but I did end up writing a simple function to do this. Hope this helps,

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It would be preferable to have the smallest amount of code that fixes the OP's problem actually in the answer, instead of a link. If the link dies or moves, your answer becomes useless. –  George Stocker May 9 '13 at 12:22
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