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So, I have a listbox GUI element that is bound to a BindingList. The problem I encounter is that whenever I add an item gets added to the BindingList, the corresponding item in the listbox gets selected. This is a big deal because it fires the SelectedIndexChanged event in the listbox, which is set to be somewhat resource intensive.

How can I remove this default behavior?

EDIT: Here is the code that I am using

BindingList<KeyValuePair<int, string>> savedGLs;
public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    savedGLs = new BindingList<KeyValuePair<int, string>>();
    lstGLs.DataSource = savedGLs;//lstGLs is my listbox
    lstGLs.DisplayMember = "Value";
    lstGLs.ValueMember = "Key";
    populateMgmtCos();
    populateSavedGLs();//this is where the SelectedIndexChanged event is firing
}
private void populateSavedGLs()
{
    savedGLs.Clear();
    string errmsg = string.Empty;
    using (SqlConnection sqlConn = new SqlConnection(getConnString(true)))
    {
        string sCmd = " SELECT Name, Hmy FROM GLTable";
        DataTable dt = MySqlHelper.ExecuteForDataTable(sqlConn, sCmd, out errmsg);
        foreach (DataRow dr in dt.Rows)
            savedGLs.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,string>(int.Parse(dr["Hmy"].ToString()), dr["Name"].ToString().Trim()));
     }
}

EDIT2: Could it be because I'm using the 3.5 framework? I just created a new project with almost nothing in it, other than the code to replicate my issue. The BindingList's Add() method definitely seems to be calling the SelectedIndexChanged method on my listbox, twice when the first item is added, and once every time afterwards. This is the complete code to that new project:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        BindingList<KeyValuePair<int, string>> bl;
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            bl = new BindingList<KeyValuePair<int, string>>();
            listBox1.DataSource = bl;
            bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(1, "blah1"));
            bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(2, "blah2"));
            bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(3, "blah3"));
            bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(4, "blah4"));
            bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(5, "blah5"));
        }

        private void listBox1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("blah");
        }
    }
}
output:
blah
blah
blah
blah
blah
blah
share|improve this question
2  
I've just tried to replicate but adding items to the databound BindingList isn't causing the SelectedIndexChanged to fire. Only when I set the ListBox datasource to null before adding the item and then re-assinging the datasource does the event fire. Can you post your code? –  ForkandBeard Jul 25 '12 at 16:16
    
You aren't adding items to the binding list, you are clearing it and re-populating it. –  LarsTech Jul 25 '12 at 16:47
    
That's true, it didn't occur to me that the Clear() method might be part of the problem... through debugging though, I can definitely tell that it's the .Add() method that is triggering the event. –  Kreg Jul 25 '12 at 16:59
    
I just tested, and removing the call to Clear() does not affect the firing of the listbox event. –  Kreg Jul 25 '12 at 17:07
    
It's not reproducible though. Adding items to a BindingList does not make the ListBox change it's SelectedIndex. The issue is coming from somewhere else in your code. –  LarsTech Jul 25 '12 at 17:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Finally, reproducible.

Don't add those items to the BindingList during the constructor.

Quick fix is to override the OnLoad method of the form:

protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e) {
  bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(1, "blah1"));
  bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(2, "blah2"));
  bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(3, "blah3"));
  bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(4, "blah4"));
  bl.Add(new KeyValuePair<int, string>(5, "blah5"));
  base.OnLoad(e);
}

or from your production code:

public Form1()
{
  InitializeComponent();
  savedGLs = new BindingList<KeyValuePair<int, string>>();
  lstGLs.DisplayMember = "Value";
  lstGLs.ValueMember = "Key";
  lstGLs.DataSource = savedGLs;
}

protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e) {
  populateMgmtCos();
  populateSavedGLs();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Bravo, that did it! Out of curiosity, why does moving the method calls out of the constructor make the difference? –  Kreg Jul 25 '12 at 18:51
    
@Kreg I can't recall why that "bug" is there. But once you posted that code that showed the goofiness, it was easy to fix. –  LarsTech Jul 25 '12 at 19:03

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