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I don't get it. I want a simple line with arrow so I use a class with border and a background-image:

hr {
    padding-top: 10px;
    border: none;
    border-top:dotted #000 1px;
    background: #fff url("img/arrow.gif") no-repeat 100px -1px;
 }

Unfortunately the background is below the border:

enter image description here

I've tried z-index, "id beats class" (with <hr id="arrow">) but nothing worked. Is there a solution?

BTW, how the css-cracks would do such a dotted line with arrow?

share|improve this question
2  
Is your arrow.gif transparent? – Deekor Jul 25 '12 at 15:50
1  
I guess position -1 is not enough, try, -2 or -3 – Mr. Alien Jul 25 '12 at 15:51
    
Just sussed out a way of doing this without :after - jsfiddle.net/spacebeers/T8Yzj/39 – SpaceBeers Jul 25 '12 at 16:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

EDIT: I've been looking at doing this without :after, only because I don't like being downvoted :)

The best I can come up with is this:

.box3 {
    z-index: 100;
    border: none;
    padding: 10px 0 30px 0;    
    background-image: url("http://test.mark-design.co.uk/4ik4e7ic.png"), url('http://test.mark-design.co.uk/line.png');
    background-position: 50% -1px, left top;
    background-repeat: no-repeat, repeat-x;
}

It uses the multiple backgrounds in CSS3 so it won't be massively supported yet but works and is a fairly interesting way of doing it - http://jsfiddle.net/spacebeers/T8Yzj/39/

The image needs tweaking as does the padding but the result is sound.

share|improve this answer
    
This is an answer? – feeela Jul 25 '12 at 15:51
1  
It's going to be. Just wanted to get something down quickly while I work on it... – SpaceBeers Jul 25 '12 at 15:51
    
He's having the image, doesn't want to accomplish using CSS – Mr. Alien Jul 25 '12 at 15:51
1  
Its bad practice to just jot down a bad answer while you work on something bigger and better... its not a race. – Tim Jul 25 '12 at 15:55
1  
Works perfekt, thank you! – Bazi Jul 25 '12 at 16:57

A background image is always wrapped by the containers border.

See: http://reference.sitepoint.com/css/boxmodel

You will need an additional element below to add the arrow. This could be achieved by using :after on the desired element.

/* not tested */
hr {
    position: relative;
    margin-top: 10px;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #000;
}

hr:after {
    content: "";
    position:absolute;
    right: 0px; top:0px;
    width: 16px; height: 16px;
    background: transparent url("img/arrow.gif") no-repeat right top;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just sussed out a way of doing this without :after - jsfiddle.net/spacebeers/T8Yzj/39 – SpaceBeers Jul 25 '12 at 16:25
    
Fine, thank you, works perfekt in FF. In IE (9.x) and Opera, I just see the dotted line. In Chrome I see the arrow but the dotted border goes through... Is there a solution for all browsers or is it better to do such a dooted line with arrow as a whole image? – Bazi Jul 25 '12 at 16:36
    
background-clip can override that rule and you can run background images under the border: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/background-clip – worc Jan 17 at 3:07
    
@worc As this answer was orignally posted the background-clip property was not ready for cross browser usage. You may also could have updated the answer instead of downvoting it… – feeela Jan 21 at 10:07
    
@feeela i could've, but it would drastically change the content of the answer. i have points to spare, so i did the next best thing and pushed the answer down and provided some new information that i had come across. – worc Jan 22 at 23:59

Consider using CSS triangles instead of an image:

<hr class="arrow">

css:

.arrow {
    position:relative
}

.arrow:after {
    content: "";
    position:absolute;
    top:0px;
    left:100px;
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-left: 10px solid transparent;
    border-right: 10px solid transparent;    
    border-top: 10px solid #000;
}

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
1  
Elegant way, but it doesn't work with dotted design, right? – Bazi Jul 25 '12 at 16:38

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