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This question already has an answer here:

I've never stumbled across this before, but I have now and am surprised that I can't find a really easy way to convert an IEnumerable<char> to a string.

The best way I can think of is string str = new string(myEnumerable.ToArray());, but, to me, it seems like this would create a new char[], and then create a new string from that, which seems expensive.

I would've thought this would be common functionality built into the .NET framework somewhere. Is there a simpler way to do this?

For those interested, the reason I'd like to use this is to use LINQ to filter strings:

string allowedString = new string(inputString.Where(c => allowedChars.Contains(c)).ToArray());
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marked as duplicate by gius, vcsjones c# Apr 14 '15 at 3:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Strange, i've asked myself the same thing a few minutes ago: stackoverflow.com/questions/11653119/… – Tim Schmelter Jul 25 '12 at 16:22
    
How weird! I did do a search for a similar question and was surprised I couldn't find any. I could indeed use that solution too though! – Connell Watkins Jul 25 '12 at 16:26
    
Yes, that might be more efficient. But you have a white- instead of a black-list. So you need inputString.Intersect(allowedChars) instead. – Tim Schmelter Jul 25 '12 at 16:55
1  
Just out of curiosity is allowedChars a HashSet<char>? I have learned first hand how it can give you a performance boost. It cut the time down from 34 seconds to process a file to 4. – Scott Chamberlain Jul 3 '13 at 22:42
1  
@Scott nope, it was a compile-time constant string. Wow, that's one hell of a performance boost though. I'll remember to try that out next time ;) – Connell Watkins Jul 10 '13 at 13:57
up vote 65 down vote accepted

You can use String.Concat().

var allowedString = String.Concat(
    inputString.Where(c => allowedChars.Contains(c))
);

Caveat: This approach will have some performance implications. It seems that String.Concat doesn't special case collections of characters so it seems that it performs as if every character was converted to a string then concatenated (and it actually does). Sure this gives you a builtin way to accomplish this task, but it could be done better.

I don't think there are any implementations within the framework that will special case char so you'll have to implement it. A simple loop appending characters to a string builder is simple enough to create.


Here's some benchmarks I took on a dev machine and it looks about right.

1000000 iterations on a 300 character sequence on a 32-bit release build:

ToArrayString:        00:00:03.1695463
Concat:               00:00:07.2518054
StringBuilderChars:   00:00:03.1335455
StringBuilderStrings: 00:00:06.4618266
static readonly IEnumerable<char> seq = Enumerable.Repeat('a', 300);

static string ToArrayString(IEnumerable<char> charSequence)
{
    return new String(charSequence.ToArray());
}

static string Concat(IEnumerable<char> charSequence)
{
    return String.Concat(charSequence);
}

static string StringBuilderChars(IEnumerable<char> charSequence)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (var c in charSequence)
    {
        sb.Append(c);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}

static string StringBuilderStrings(IEnumerable<char> charSequence)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (var c in charSequence)
    {
        sb.Append(c.ToString());
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}
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6  
... which probably uses a StringBuilder internally, which in turn uses a dynamically growing char[] internally, from which the final string is created. Doesn't seem like much difference to new string(.ToArray()). – dtb Jul 25 '12 at 16:21
    
It does indeed use a stringbuilder internally. – Chris Jul 25 '12 at 16:25
1  
Seeing as how a string is a fixed array of characters, you can't avoid condensing an enumerable down into one in order to construct it. Either that happens in your own code, or somewhere inside the framework. – MikeP Jul 25 '12 at 16:30
1  
The difference is that a string needs to be immutable, so when it accepts a char[] from an outside source it needs to copy it so that changes won't be reflected in the new string. If the char[] is constructed internally (i.e. from an IEnumerable<char> passed in) then no copy needs to be made. Passing the IEnumerable doesn't prevent the conversion to the array, it prevents the copy of that array. – Servy Jul 25 '12 at 16:36
1  
@Servy I understand what you say. But if it is true that it uses a StringBuilder, and if it uses sb.ToString() eventually on that StringBuilder instance, then sb.ToString() might also copy the data. Because in general a StringBuilder can live on (and be mutated) after .ToString() has been called on it. But I agree they could have made tricks that prevented the final copy, for example if StringBuilder had a non-public method ToStringWithoutCopy. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 8 '13 at 19:04

I've made this the subject of another question but more and more, that is becoming a direct answer to this question.

I've done some performance testing of 3 simple methods of converting an IEnumerable<char> to a string, those methods are

new string

return new string(charSequence.ToArray());

Concat

return string.Concat(charSequence)

StringBuilder

var sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (var c in charSequence)
{
    sb.Append(c);
}

return sb.ToString();

In my testing, that is detailed in the linked question, for 1000000 iterations of "Some reasonably small test data" I get results like this,

1000000 iterations of "Concat" took 1597ms.

1000000 iterations of "new string" took 869ms.

1000000 iterations of "StringBuilder" took 748ms.

This suggests to me that there is not good reason to use string.Concat for this task. If you want simplicity use the new string approach and if want performance use the StringBuilder.

I would caveat my assertion, in practice all these methods work fine, and this could all be over optimization.

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As of .NET 4, many string methods take IEnumerable as arguments.

string.Concat(myEnumerable);
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My data is contrary to the results Jodrell posted. First have a look at the extension methods I use:

public static string AsStringConcat(this IEnumerable<char> characters)
{        
    return String.Concat(characters);
}

public static string AsStringNew(this IEnumerable<char> characters)
{
    return new String(characters.ToArray());
}

public static string AsStringSb(this IEnumerable<char> characters)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (char c in characters)
    {
        sb.Append(c);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}

My results

With

  • STRLEN = 31
  • ITERATIONS = 1000000

Input

  • ((IEnumerable<char>)RandomString(STRLEN)).Reverse()

Results

  • Concat: 1x
  • New: 3x
  • StringBuilder: 3x

Input

  • ((IEnumerable<char>)RandomString(STRLEN)).Take((int)ITERATIONS/2)

Results

  • Concat: 1x
  • New: 7x
  • StringBuilder: 7x

Input

  • ((IEnumerable<char>)RandomString(STRLEN)) (this is just an upcast)

Results

  • Concat: 0 ms
  • New: 2000 ms
  • StringBuilder: 2000 ms
  • Downcast: 0 ms

I ran this on an Intel i5 760 targeting .NET Framework 3.5.

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1  
For what its worth, my tests targeted .Net 4.0 and were run against a release build, from the command line, without a debugger attached. Try your tests with a purer sequence, rather than a cast. Something like Enumerable.Range(65, 26).Select(i => (char)i);, this should avoid the chance for an optimized shortcut. – Jodrell Oct 28 '13 at 9:39

Here is a more succinct version of the StringBuilder answer:

return charSequence.Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (seed, c) => seed.Append(c)).ToString();

I timed this using the same tests that Jeff Mercado used and this was 1 second slower across 1,000,000 iterations on the same 300 character sequence (32-bit release build) than the more explicit:

static string StringBuilderChars(IEnumerable<char> charSequence)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (var c in charSequence)
    {
        sb.Append(c);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}

So if you're a fan of accumulators then here you go.

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Another possibility is using

string.Join("", myEnumerable);

I did not measure the performance.

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