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I am using VBA to generate SQL queries in Access. I have two SQL queries that return two lists of items with a status column that shows Required or Optional:

"SELECT *, 'Required' as status FROM tblMain WHERE " & where_1
"SELECT *, 'Optional' as status FROM tblMain WHERE " & where_2

*where_1* and *where_2* are string variables I build within the VBA--it's not really important what they are though.

What I'd like to do is have one combined list, and if an item shows in both lists, I'd like that item to show just once with a "Required" status ("Required" trumps "Optional"). I started with a union query, but I'm not sure how to eliminate the duplicate rows with the "Optional" statuses.

SELECT * FROM
((SELECT *, 'Required' as status FROM tblMain WHERE where_1)
UNION
(SELECT *, 'Optional' as status FROM tblMain WHERE where_2))

I'm thinking a DISTINCT or possibly a FIRST could be used, but unfortunately I'm having trouble working out the syntax.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suggest you eliminate IDs selected in the first statement from the second statement.

SELECT *, 'Required' as status FROM tblMain WHERE where_1
UNION
SELECT *, 'Optional' as status FROM tblMain WHERE where_2
AND ID Not IN (SELECT ID FROM tblMain WHERE where_1)
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He didn't say that he has IDs at all. –  Angelo Fuchs Jul 25 '12 at 16:33
    
I do have IDs. This looks great--I'll test it now. Thanks! –  rryanp Jul 25 '12 at 16:34
    
This worked great, though unfortunately with the data I had, the query ran pretty slow causing a delay (20 seconds or so) in the front end refreshing. I ended up using VBA to dump all the IDs to a temp table and running the query off of that, but this did work. Thanks! –  rryanp Jul 30 '12 at 13:19

you could use MAX.

SELECT *, MAX(status) FROM
((SELECT *, 'Required' as status FROM tblMain WHERE where_1)
UNION
(SELECT *, 'Optional' as status FROM tblMain WHERE where_2))
GROUP BY all_other_columns

Be aware that you have to replace 'all_other_comuns' by your actual columns.

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When you run MAX against a string like that, does it go by alphabetical order? I'll test this. Thanks! –  rryanp Jul 25 '12 at 16:36
    
@rryanp It does so in any DB I have used to this day, but I haven't used Access yet. –  Angelo Fuchs Jul 25 '12 at 16:43
    
I tested this and got an error--I didn't troubleshoot too much, but I think maybe Access may have trouble using Max with string values, as I tried it against an integer field, and it worked fine. I actually used it in another place in my DB, so thanks! –  rryanp Jul 30 '12 at 13:21
    
@rryanp well good to know. If you want to, you can substitute Required and Optional with numbers and do a CASE WHEN to produce the Strings afterward. (Or if you process the result in a program afterward you can stick to numbers anyway). –  Angelo Fuchs Jul 31 '12 at 12:35

Since all of the data is coming from a single table, the best option may be to move the logic from a second query to the status column itself:

SELECT *, iif(condition1,'Required','Optional') as status 
FROM tblMain

This way each row in tblMain is only retrieved once in the first place.

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You can do this without a union:

SELECT *,
       (case when where_1 then 'Required'
             when where_2 then 'Optional'
        end) as status
FROM tblMain
WHERE (where_1) or (where_2)

Alas, though, you don't have the case statement in ACCESS, so you use iif() instead:

SELECT *,
       iif(where_1, 'Required', 'Optional') as status
FROM tblMain
WHERE (where_1) or (where_2)
share|improve this answer
    
SQL is a generic tag, the particular flavour required is MS Access, so no case, I am afraid. –  Fionnuala Jul 25 '12 at 18:31

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