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I would like to fill the space between html attributes regularly in order to simplify editing in block mode.

Example:

<p><input type="a" name="a" value="foo a"></p>
<p><input type="ab" name="ab" value="ab bar"></p>
<p><input type="abc" name="abc" value="baz abc"></p>

Select the three inputs in visual block mode and do some magic.

Output:

<p><input type="a"   name="a"   value="foo a"  ></p>
<p><input type="ab"  name="ab"  value="ab bar" ></p>
<p><input type="abc" name="abc" value="baz abc"></p>

(Preferably without filling out the spaces between values.)

How do I do that?

Edit: And a way back (after editing) would be nice, too.

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I think that's ugly and it's more important to keep your code clean than adapting it to an editor. – Meitham Jul 25 '12 at 16:47
2  
I agree and that's the reason why I want a way back, too. – Ivaldi Jul 25 '12 at 16:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do this with the Align plugin:

:AlignCtrl mIp1P0=l
:Align \i\+=

or build a mapping with it:

map <unique> <SID>WS    <Plug>AlignMapsWrapperStart
nmap <unique> <SID>WE   <Plug>AlignMapsWrapperEnd
map <silent> <script> <Leader>aa <SID>WS:AlignCtrl mIp1P0=l<CR><CR>:'a,'zAlign \i\+\s*=<CR><SID>WE

There's also an alternative to Align called Tabularize.

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Works fine and for the way back I'll use a small python script. – Ivaldi Jul 26 '12 at 8:18

You can use an external tool for that, I use astyle for my C/C++ coding, to make it automatic I inserted the following in my ~/.vimrc file:

if filereadable("/usr/bin/astyle")
    silent! %!astyle
endif

You can search for Tidy if it meets your needs.

Obs.: With :%! you pass all the code to the external tool "!, for specific selection '<,'>! should be used.

Now you can map a shortcut to this command.

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You can also look into setting your preferred formatter to formatprg or equalprg. It doesn't buy you much, but it is the "standard". – Matt Boehm Jul 25 '12 at 17:50

If there only one space between attributes you can make that :

 :s/"\s/"\t/g

You can see more here.

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If someone kown why :s/"\s*/"\t/g doesn't work ? – Zulu Jul 25 '12 at 17:49
1  
You probably want :s/"\s\+/"\t/g + means 1 or more, and by default must be escaped in vim if you want the operator and not literal plus – Matt Boehm Jul 25 '12 at 17:53

What kind of edits are you doing in block mode? There is probably an easier way to edit.

Here's an example:

removing type="*":

  • linewise visually select the block (i.e V})
  • type :norm WdW

explanation:

  • When you type : with a visual selection, you should see :'<,'> in the command line. This means do the following command on just the selection
  • :norm means interpret the following characters in normal mode
  • W jumps to the beginning of the next Word
  • dW deletes until the beginning of the following Word

I did have to align words as you describe once for a specific case where it was preferred for readability (it's usually frowned upon). I ended up doing a quick hack to get the job done. In your case, it would look like:

  • (select block)
  • :'<,'>s/ / /g
  • (go to first space after "input")
  • (note the column number in the lower right (10))
  • gv (reselect block)
  • :norm 10ldw (delete
  • (go to first space after "abc" (because this is the longest value for this column))
  • (note the column number (21))
  • :norm 21ldw

... and so on

If you just want to delete a column, you could just convert 1 space into many, block select the column including some empty spaces on each side, delete, and convert many spaces back to one.

As I said before, this method is very fragile and only possible when spaces are only used to delimit columns. Instead of using :norm on a block, you can also consider making macros or trying to accomplish your editing tasks with find and replace

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