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I have the following code:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

BEGIN {
       my $supported = undef;
       *compute_factorial = sub { if (eval { require bignum; bignum->import(); 1;}) {
                                    my $num       = shift;
                                    my $factorial = 1;
                                    foreach my $num (1..$num) {
                                        $factorial *= $num; 
                                    }
                                    return $factorial;
                                  }  else {
                                       undef;
                                     } };
       };

my $f = compute_factorial(25);
say $f;

I'm just testing something, not really a production code... I do have bignum pragma on my machine (perfectly loadable using use), I was wondering why require doesn't work as it should be (I'm getting exponential numbers rather then "big numbers") in this case?

Thanks,

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1  
what makes you think require doesn't load it in this case? –  ysth Jul 25 '12 at 17:19
    
I still get exponential numbers when $num is >= 19 on my 32bit machine –  snoofkin Jul 25 '12 at 17:20
    
I meant it loads it, but doesnt import what it needs I guess..since I dont get undef value –  snoofkin Jul 25 '12 at 17:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

bignum's import needs to be called before compilation of the code it is intended to effect, or it doesn't work. Here, the BEGIN makes it called before your actual compute_factorial call, but not before the critical my $factorial = 1; is compiled.

A better approach for cases like this is just to directly use Math::Big*:

if (eval { require Math::BigInt }) {
    my $num = shift;
    my $factorial = Math::BigInt->new(1);
    foreach my $num (1..$num) {
        $factorial *= $num;                            
    }
    return $factorial;
} else {
    undef;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I like this method. Just to clarify, the bignum pragma automagically upgrades numbers to Math::Big* objects. So if the automagic is causing problems, ysth is suggesting to simply make these objects manually. –  Joel Berger Jul 26 '12 at 3:49
1  
dont really get it, isnt using 'use' instead of 'require' makes it load the module at compile time? how does this works in this case? I used 'require' to make sure that the module is available at RUNTIME. –  snoofkin Jul 26 '12 at 13:41
    
but I think I should bang my head against the wall first...BEGIN is a compile the directive, so this block will run at compile time, including the 'require' in it? –  snoofkin Jul 26 '12 at 14:09
1  
@soulSurfer2010, The above code was buggy. Fixed s/use/require/. Hopefully it makes more sense now. –  ikegami Jul 26 '12 at 15:44
    
thanks, ikegami, wasn't thinking –  ysth Jul 26 '12 at 16:32
BEGIN {
   require bignum;
   import bignum;
   my $x = 1;
}

and

require bignum;
import bignum;
my $x = 1;

are the same because require and import are executed after my $x = 1; is already compiled, so bignum never has a chance to make my $x = 1; compile into my $x = Math::BigInt->new(1);. Keep in mind that

use bignum;
my $x = 1;

is actually

BEGIN {
   require bignum;
   import bignum;
}
my $x = 1;

and not

BEGIN {
   require bignum;
   import bignum;
   my $x = 1;
}

The solution would be

BEGIN {
   my $sub;
   if (eval { require bignum; }) {
      $sub = eval(<<'__EOI__') or die $@;
         use bignum;
         sub {
            my ($num) = @_;
            my $factorial = 1;
            $factorial *= $_ for 2..$num;
            return $factorial;
         }
__EOI__
   } else {
      $sub = sub { croak "Unsupported" };
   }

   *factorial = $sub;
}

Of course, since you can simply eliminate the pragma, that would be best.

BEGIN {
   my $sub;
   if (eval { require Math::BigInt; }) {
      require Math::BigInt;
      $sub = sub {
         my ($num) = @_;
         my $factorial = Math::BigInt->new(1);
         $factorial *= $_ for 2..$num;
         return $factorial;
      };
   } else {
      $sub = sub { croak "Unsupported" };
   }

   *factorial = $sub;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In both cases, you only need the BEGIN if you want to be able to do factorial 20 instead of just factorial(20). –  ikegami Jul 25 '12 at 20:22

As many other pragmas, in newer versions of Perl bignum is only active in scope where you imported it. However, unlike many it also does some funky messing up with upgrading scoped numbers that doesn't quite work with just require. You will have to break check for its existence and use in two different files to isolate scope and still let it do its magic.

big.pl

if (eval { require bignum; 1 }) {
    require big_loader;
}

print big_loader::big_num_returner();

print "still ok\n";

big_loader.pm

package big_loader;
use bignum;

sub big_num_returner {
    return 2**512
}

1;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Beat me by 15 seconds. :) –  pilcrow Jul 25 '12 at 17:31
    
doesn't help; it still isn't called soon enough. in any case, you are incorrect. import expects the extra level of scope (think about use Foo => BEGIN { require Foo; import Foo }); the pragma hint is set for the entire remainder of the OP's BEGIN block, but only at runtime of that block. –  ysth Jul 25 '12 at 17:45
    
@ysth, hm, indeed. Looking at source it is a little trickier. See updated answer. –  Oleg V. Volkov Jul 25 '12 at 18:00

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