Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's suppose that I have a class container:

template<class T, int size>
class container
{
private:
    T* data;
    int length;
public:
    container()
    {
        data=new T[size];
        length=size;
    }
    ~container()
    {
        if(length>0)
            delete[] data;
    }
    container& operator= (container<T,size> c)
    {
        if(length>0)
           delete[] data;
        data=new T[c.length];
        length=c.length;
        for(int i=0; i<length; i++)
            data[i]=c.data[i];
        return *this;
    }
};

The problem is that if I have two container of different size, I can't use the = operator to assign one to the other.For example:

container<int,4> c1;
container<int,5> c2;
c1=c2;  // syntax error: 4!=5

Classes like c++11 array allow to do this.
How to do that?

share|improve this question
4  
Why is size a template parameter? The size of your container appears to be dynamic. –  James McNellis Jul 25 '12 at 17:14
1  
You don't just have two containers of different size, you have two objects with different template parameters - they're not compatible. To the compiler, it's as if you tried to assign a container of ints to a container of floats. Typically the length of a container is not a template parameter. –  Rob I Jul 25 '12 at 17:15
1  
Remember a copy constructor. By making the size a template parameter, you're kind of messing up the point of using dynamic memory, too. You can't get the user to enter a size, for example. –  chris Jul 25 '12 at 17:15
    
C++11's std::array doesn't allow you to change the container's size, which is what you're attempting to do here. –  interjay Jul 25 '12 at 17:19
1  
Your last paragraph is wrong, std::array doesn't allow you to assign from a different size std::array. –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 25 '12 at 17:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Templates are just that -- templates the compiler uses to make classes, not classes themselves.

Thus, container<int,4> and container<int,5> are completely separate classes, with all of the access restrictions that implies.

In particular, this means that container<int, 4>'s assignment operator cannot access the private memebers of container<int,5>.

There are a few ways to get around this:

  • Eliminate the size template argument, since as others have noted, you seem to be allocating memory dynamically, so nailing down the size at compile time isn't adding any value, and in fact could be misleading since your assignment operator could result in a different size than the one declared.
  • Implement your assignment operator in terms of container's public interface.
  • Declare all container classes of the same type as friends by adding the following line to your class:

Code:

template<class U, int otherSize> friend class Foo;

and declaring your assignment operator as follows:

template <int otherSize>
container<T,size>& operator=(container<T,otherSize> c);
share|improve this answer

You need to parametrize your assigment operator with size of container you want to assign from (ignoring any other issues with posted code):

    template <int otherSize>
    container& operator= (container<T,otherSize> c)
    {
        if(length>0)
           delete[] data;
        data=new T[otherSize];
        length=otherSize;
        for(int i=0; i<otherSize; i++)
            data[i]=c.data[i];
        return *this;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Won't compile, data is private. Other then that the only possible solution, although the problems stated in the question's comments still persist. –  Zeta Jul 25 '12 at 17:28
    
Obviously, since orginal code will not compile (also for this reason) ;) –  Tomasz Kłak Jul 25 '12 at 17:29

As commenters have pointed out, having the initial size be a template parameter looks wrong, and is the source of your problems.

But considering the general question of assigning from two incompatible containers, you could have a templated operator= as tumdum's answer shows, but that doesn't help when you want to fill the container from another, slightly-different type.

The standard containers solve the problem by allowing construction and assignment from a range, defined by a pair of iterators:

template<typename FwdIter>
  container(FwdIter begin, FwdIter end)
  {
    data=new T[length = std::distance(begin, end)];
    std::copy(begin, end, data);
  }

template<typename FwdIter>
  void
  assign(FwdIter begin, FwdIter end)
  {
    container(begin, end).swap(*this);
  }

void swap(container& c)
{
  std::swap(data, c.data);
  std::swap(length, c.length);
}

iterator begin() { return data; }
const_iterator begin() const { return data; }
const_iterator cbegin() const { return data; }
iterator end() { return data+size; }
const_iterator end() const { return data+size; }
const_iterator cend() const { return data+size; }

Now you can do:

container<int,4> c1;
container<int,5> c2;
c1.assign(c2.begin(), c2.end());
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.