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The Problem

I'm using jQuery to post a (relatively) large amount of data to a web system I am migrating from Ubuntu to CentOS (a painful process). The problem is that the data being received is truncated. Sending the same data from the server to the client results in no truncation.

The amount of data being 'sent' (that is, what I'm seeing while debugging Javascript) is 116,902 bytes (the correct amount of data), whereas the amount of data being received is approximately 115,668 bytes: this number seems to vary, making me believe the problem may be time related. The transaction completes (receive, response) in approximately 3.1 seconds, not a huge amount of time. Are there any settings I should examine?

That idea aside, my PHP installation is configured to accept 8M of post data and use to 128M of physical memory, which seems plenty enough.

The jQuery code is below. I'm quite sure this isn't the problem, but I've included it as requested.

Receiving:

function synchronise_down()
{
    $.ajax({url: "scripts/get_data.php",
        context: document.body,
        dataType: "json",
        type: "POST",
        success: function(result)
            {
                // Fix the state up.
                update_data(result);

                // Execute on syncronise.
                execute_on_synchronise();
            },
        error: function(what, huh)
            {
                IS_WAITING = false;
            }
        });
}

Sending:

function synchronise_up()
{
    var serialised = MIRM_MODEL.serialise();
    LAST_SERIALISED = new Date().getTime();
    $.ajax({url: "scripts/save_model.php",
        context: document.body,
        dataType: "json",
        data: {"model":serialised},
        type: "POST",
        success: function(result)
            {
                // Fix the state up.
                update_data(result, true);

                // Execute on syncronise.
                execute_on_synchronise();
            },
        error: function(what, huh)
            {
                IS_WAITING = false;
            }
        });
}

Workaround (Wouldn't call this a solution)

Edit: I've 'fixed' this, but not necessarily found out what the problem is and how to solve it. It's an interesting problem so I'll describe my workaround and leave the question open.

What I'm doing is rather than letting jquery handle the serialisation of my large data, I'm doing it myself first, essentially serialising twice. the code for this is as follows:

function synchronise_up()
{
    var serialised = JSON.stringify(MIRM_MODEL.serialise());
    LAST_SERIALISED = new Date().getTime();
    $.ajax({url: "scripts/save_model.php",
        context: document.body,
        dataType: "json",
        data: {"model":serialised},
        type: "POST",
        success: function(result)
            {
                // Fix the state up.
                update_data(result, true);

                // Execute on syncronise.
                execute_on_synchronise();
            },
        error: function(what, huh)
            {
                IS_WAITING = false;
            }
        });
}

The important line is of course:

var serialised = JSON.stringify(MIRM_MODEL.serialise());

Now, when it hits the server, I need to decode this data because it's been serialised twice. There are added costs with this 'solution': sending more data, doing more work. The question still remains: what's the problem, and what's the real solution?

share|improve this question
    
When you examine the actual data, can you see the truncation? –  Second Rikudo Jul 25 '12 at 17:44
    
can include your jquery code? –  ajreal Jul 25 '12 at 17:49
    
@Truth yes the truncation is visible. The data in question is inserted into a database on being received, and checking the database shows the data is bad. Also, retrieving the data from the server from the client shows the same. –  Liam M Jul 25 '12 at 17:50
    
@ajreal Added it to my original post. I'm pretty sure it's fine (it's been working fine for a few months), but you asked so there it is. Some unexplained bits in there, but all that's working fine. –  Liam M Jul 25 '12 at 17:52
    
I've 'solved' this, sort of. Read my 'solution' for details. The question remains unanswered though. –  Liam M Jul 25 '12 at 19:06

4 Answers 4

Try setting jQuery's ajax timeout parameter to a high number (note, it's in milliseconds, so you'll probably want 10000 which is 10 seconds). Some other options to try: 1. Check that your PHP max execution time is a decent amount. I doubt this would be related but it's possible. 2. On jQuery's error function, run console.log(xhr) on the XHR result (you'd have to do this in Chrome or find another method of seeing the result). XHR is an XHR object that contains debug information on what happened with the connection e.g. Status codes, timeout info, etc.

EDIT: Also, have you checked the max size of the field in your Database? It's quite possible that the Database is automatically truncating the information.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestions, I'll try them out next week, I'm about to hop on a plane. I can definitely say it's not the database, I'm using a long text column and there are no storage issues there. –  Liam M Jul 26 '12 at 7:04
    
Okay, I've checked it out and it's not a time-out thing: the failure occurs within 3 seconds, my time-outs are all much higher than that. –  Liam M Aug 1 '12 at 7:32

my gut feeling is that it's a php timeout related, i've never heard of a javascript timeout - and I have jquery's running for 3 or 4 hours, but then they continue to post little updates (like a _SESSION progress bar in PHP ... but I digress.. anyway you HAVE to use firefox for this, IE doesn't "believe" you when you know what you are doing and times out after about 40 minutes) ~ chrome wasn't used by me at the time.

Actually, come to think of it, you say you are migrating to CentOS sounds to me like is HAS to be server related. You are simply looking in the wrong place.

BTW congrats on CentOS it's AMAZING! I would do it the easy way and have an entire LAMP CentOS VM just fo rthis app (try not to faff with the vhosts for this it's v v messy) and simply set the whole apache/php install to be insanely high.

The correct php.ini settings are

max_input_time //(not max_execution_time!)
upload_max_filesize
post_max_size
// .. and try    
memory_limit
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Conners, I've just gotten back froma trip this afternoon so I'll check it out tomorrow morning. I think you may be right, the max input time looks very interesting and I'm keen to see what the value is. PS, CentOS is a right pain in the arse - I've since had to change to Ubuntu because the packages available to me were far, far too old and the inconvenience of building/finding them all wasn't nearly worth my time. Ubuntu for the win :). –  Liam M Jul 30 '12 at 8:28
    
<3 Cent OS :D sorry you are struggling (if fact, doing a fresh host with about 4 CentOS Vms this morning ~:D) if you need any help drop me a email –  conners Jul 30 '12 at 12:41
    
Okay, I've checked it out and no dice. My maximum execution time was 6o seconds, whereas the failure occurs within about 3 seconds. PS, CentOS has it's pros, but the packages are just far, far too old to be of use to me. Thanks for the offer though :). –  Liam M Aug 1 '12 at 7:31
    
those values: up them anyway.. make them maximum.. there is all sorts of post size limits and all the rest.. one thing is it's essential to be thorough you might want to bite the bullet and go fine-tooth-comb-mode: i.e. you MUST do is go onto Ubuntu and write down those scores (for the params above) and then apply them, and if that fails to the httpd.conf/php.ini line by line bearing mind there will doubtless be a huge version span and make sure that each property –  conners Aug 1 '12 at 12:26
    
(including any vhost.conf and .htaccess properties - increasingly these are where "things get set") it's a massive royal pain but I am 100% sure it's a server issue I would stake my (feeble) reputation on it. I used to work for a university and I did the ENTIRE AD account creation script in jQuery/PHP and it ran for 8 hours daily during student enrolment (creating printing accounts, file folders, library logins, email accounts, student record system items, moodle info) –  conners Aug 1 '12 at 12:27

Check the following php.ini variables:

post_max_size

max_input_vars - This might actually be the culprit because it truncates data

share|improve this answer

PHP POST/GET/COOKIE are limited to 1000 entries by default. Everything above that is ignored. It is the number of entries that count, not the actual amount of data. I sugest you to edit your php.ini and set the max_input_vars setting to a greater value.

Regards.

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