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According to Albahari brothers[Page No.273],IEnumerable is used because:

By defining a single method returning an enumerator,IEnumerable provides flexibility in that the

->iteration logic can be framed off to another class(Understood)

->Moreover it means that several consumers can enumerate the collection at once without interfering with each other(Not understood)

I am not able to understand the second point!

How can IEnumerable instead of using IEnumerator enable multiple consumers to enumerate the collection at once?

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1  
Can you cite your reference? It is hard to understand this out of context. –  usr Jul 25 '12 at 17:54
    
IEnumerator<T> is stateful and usually represents a position in the collection being iterated. Multiple threads sharing an enumerator would need to use some synchronisation method to use one safely. The IEnumerable<T> interface allows each thread to get their own enumerator which it can use safely without needing to co-operate with other threads (unless the underlying collection changes, which is not safe and will result in an exception being thrown). –  Lee Jul 25 '12 at 18:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

IEnumerable implements a single method, GetEnumerator(), which returns an IEnumerator. Since each time the method is called, a new IEnumerator is returned, which has its own state. In this way, multiple threads can iterate over the same collection without there being any danger of one thread changing the current pointer of another one.

If a collection implements IEnumerator, then it effectively can only be iterated over by a single thread at a time. Consider the following code:

public class EnumeratorList : IEnumerator
{
    private object[] _list = new object[10];
    private int _currentIndex = -1;

    public object Current { get { return _list[_currentIndex] } };

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        return ++_currentIndex < 10;
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        _currentIndex = -1;
    }
}

Given that implementation, if two threads attempt to loop through the EnumeratorList at the same time, they will get interleaved results, and will not see the entire list.

If we refactor it into an IEnumerable, multiple threads can access the same list without such issues.

public class EnumerableList : IEnumerable
{
    private object[] _list = new object[10];

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new ListEnumerator(this);
    }

    private object this[int i]
    {
        return _list[i];
    }

    private class ListEnumerator : IEnumerator
    {
        private EnumeratorList _list;
        private int _currentIndex = -1;

        public ListEnumerator(EnumeratorList list)
        {
            _list = list;
        }

        public object Current { get { return _list[_currentIndex] } };

        public bool MoveNext()
        {
            return ++_currentIndex < 10;
        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            _currentIndex = -1;
        }
    }
}

Now this is a simple, contrived example, of course, but I hope this helps make it more clear.

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I just came to know that any type of parameter in c# is always passed by value...Thats wht makes IEnumerator imp class 2 take an object as a value type parameter and thus allows it have another copy...:) –  Anirudha Jul 25 '12 at 18:37
1  
@Anirudha, I think you are misundertending some points. C# (.NET) have "pointers" and objects is passed by reference. The line return new ListEnumerator(this); on the code abose is creating a new instance o Enumerator for each request for enumeration. That's why it works. There's no copy of list. –  devundef Jul 25 '12 at 19:04
    
@devundef i was just going through skeets article on value&ref parameters.thxx for pointing it out though.:)It just enables us to move independently within and yeah as you said its not a copy of list but a ref...Am i right now.. –  Anirudha Jul 25 '12 at 19:20

The MSDN article for IEnumerable provides a good example of proper usage.

To directly answer your question, when correctly implemented, the IEnumerator object being used to go through the collection is unique for each caller. This means that you can have several consumers call foreach on your collection, and each will have their own enumerator, with its own index into the collection.

Note that this provides only basic protection from modifications to the collection. For that, you must employ proper lock() blocks (see here) .

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Consider the code:

    class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var test = new EnumTest();
        test.ConsumeEnumerable2Times();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public class EnumTest
{
    public IEnumerable<int>  CountTo10()
    {
        for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++)
            yield return i;
    }

    public void ConsumeEnumerable2Times()
    {
        var enumerable = CountTo10();

        foreach (var n in enumerable)
        {
            foreach (int i in enumerable)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Outer: {0}, Inner: {1}", n, i);
            }
        }
    }
}

This code will produce the output:

Outer: 0, Inner: 1
Outer: 0, Inner: 2
...
Outer: 1, Inner: 0
Outer: 1, Inner: 1
...
Outer: 10, Inner: 10

Using IEnumerable you can enumerate the same collection over and over. IEnumerable actually will return a new instance of IEnumerator for every request for enumeration.

In the example above the method EnumTest() was called once but the IEnumerable returned was used 2 times. Each time counted to 10 independently.

This is why "several consumers can enumerate the collection at once without interfering with each other". You can pass the same IEnumerable object to 2 methods and they will enumerate the collection independently. With IEnumerator you can't achieve that.

Sorry about my english.

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A type that implements IEnumerator must have a method and properties such that you can iterate over it, namely MoveNext(), Reset(), and Current. What happens if you have multiple threads that try to iterate over this object at the same time? They'll step on each other as they both call the same MoveNext() function, which modifies the same Current property.

A type that implements IEnumerable must be able to provide an instance of an IEnumerator. Now what happens when multiple threads iterate over the object? Each thread will have a separate instance of an IEnumerator object. The IEnumerator's returned are not the same type of object as your collection. They are something different entirely. However, they do know how to get the next item and show the current item of your collection, and each of those objects will have it's own internal data about the current state of the enumeration. Thus, they don't step on each other and safely iterate your collection from separate threads.

Sometimes, a collection type will implement IEnumerator for itself (it is it's own enumerator), and then implement IEnumerable by just returning itself. In this case, you would gain nothing for multiple threads, because they are still all using the same object for the enumeration. This is backwards. Instead, the correct procedure is to first implement a separate (can be nested) enumerator type for your collection. You then implement IEnumerable by returning new instances of the type and implement IEnumerator by keeping a private instance.

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