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So I wrote a function to extend Objects to count how many entries are within them, so it may be used as such:

test = {"foo": "bar", "baz": 7, "darth": "maul"}

test.count()
=> 3

I wrote the code as such:

Object.prototype.count = function() {
  var count = 0, key;
  for (key in this) {
    if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      count++;
    }
  }
  return count;
}

This is my first attempt at extending with prototype, and I'm getting this error from within jQuery.js:

Uncaught TypeError: Object function () {
  var count = 0, key;
  for (key in this) {
    if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      count++;
    }
  }
  return count; 
} has no method 'replace'

The stacktrace points back to where I call css on a jQuery object onLoad:

$img.css({left: 20, top: 50});

Not that I think there's anything specific about that line, but I thought it may be good to provide.

Is there something I'm doing wrong here?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A lesson in why it can be a bad idea to extend the prototype of native types. :)

Somewhere in jQuery, it's testing a generic object for the existence of a property called count, and then treating it as a string. Since you've now caused that property to always exist, it found it, but it wasn't a string (as it expected) and broke the code.

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I've changed the function name a few times to random things with the same result. So, does this mean it's not possible to extend Object when using jQuery? I can write it as a straight function, but the extension made more sense to me (compared to length for strings) –  Kyle Macey Jul 25 '12 at 18:13
1  
It could be looking for any properties that it doesn't expect to be there. It's almost universally a bad idea to alter the prototype of Object (and to a lesser degree other types) since this affects everything that inspects object properties. Code like if (myobject.count) { ...} is de facto standard for testing property existence. If you really want to use custom methods on a generic object, then just create your own prototype and use it instead of the native object. –  Jamie Treworgy Jul 25 '12 at 18:16
    
Well that's just shotty. Thanks for the help –  Kyle Macey Jul 25 '12 at 18:17
    
.. in the case of this error which you got on the (css method) I'd actually say this is probably also an example of sloppy code in jQuery. It should use hasOwnProperty to iterate through properties, and it appears it doesn't. But that doesn't change the rule; there's just too much risk in adding your own methods or properties to Object, and testing objects with just dot notation is not considered bad practice (so a common name like count would prob. trip you up even in exceptionally well written code) –  Jamie Treworgy Jul 25 '12 at 18:21

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