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In SQL Server Management Studio, I can generate the CREATE TABLE script for a table by right-clicking a table and choosing Script Table As.

How can I get this same result in C#? Can I utilize SMO or some other methodology?

[To avoid the question getting closed, please post working code samples, not one-liners or links to the high-level documentation.]

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@sooprise If you want to back up the tables and the data, why do you want the output to be a script file? Wouldn't a COPY_ONLY BACKUP be much, much, much more convenient? – Aaron Bertrand Jul 25 '12 at 19:24

The following code will create a script at location "QQQ" by specifying the server "XXX", table "ZZZ" and schema "PPP". There are a few example scripts floating out there to do copies of entire databases, this is for just tables. This is what I was trying to figure out this whole time and I finally got it working using the code below. This is meant to be a simple example, the resulting scripts for instance don't create the indexes of a table, just its most basic structure. To specify how the script is created, pass an instance of ScriptingOptions into the call to table.Script().

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.SqlEnum;
using System.Configuration;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

namespace SmoTest {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {

            Server server = new Server("XXX");
            Database database = new Database();
            database = server.Databases["YYY"];
            Table table = database.Tables["ZZZ", @"PPP"];

            StringCollection result = table.Script();

            var script = "";
            foreach (var line in result) {
                script += line;
            }

            System.IO.StreamWriter fs = System.IO.File.CreateText(@"QQQ");
            fs.Write(script);
            fs.Close();

        }
    }
}
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Here's a slightly more complete example (stolen from my buddy Ben Miller):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.SqlEnum;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.CoreEnum;
using System.Configuration;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

namespace SmoTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Server srv = new Server();

            // really you would get these from config or elsewhere:
            srv.ConnectionContext.Login = "foo";
            srv.ConnectionContext.Password = "bar";
            srv.ConnectionContext.ServerInstance = "ServerName";
            string dbName = "DatabaseName";

            Database db = new Database();
            db = srv.Databases[dbName];

            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

            foreach(Table tbl in db.Tables)
            {
                ScriptingOptions options = new ScriptingOptions();
                options.ClusteredIndexes = true;
                options.Default = true;
                options.DriAll = true;
                options.Indexes = true;
                options.IncludeHeaders = true;

                StringCollection coll = tbl.Script(options);
                foreach (string str in coll)
                {
                    sb.Append(str);
                    sb.Append(Environment.NewLine);
                }
            }
            System.IO.StreamWriter fs = System.IO.File.CreateText("c:\\temp\\output.txt");
            fs.Write(sb.ToString());
            fs.Close();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any insights on the ScriptingOptions class? How, for instance, can I guarantee I get an exact copy of my existing table (including all properties like indexes or whatever)? There are so many properties to set here, I don't know which ones to set and which ones to leave alone. – sooprise Jul 25 '12 at 20:36
    
@sooprise I'm not sure, I probably would have opted for PowerShell in this case. You can go through the options listed here and see which ones might apply to your tables. – Aaron Bertrand Jul 25 '12 at 21:05

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