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I tried to install postgresql 8.4 in my windows 7 (64 bit). But it fails with following messages in log

Initialising the database cluster (this may take a few minutes)...
Executing cscript //NoLogo "C:\PostgreSQL\8.4/installer/server/initcluster.vbs" "postgres" "postgres" "****" "C:\PostgreSQL\8.4" "C:\PostgreSQL\data" 5432 "DEFAULT"
Script exit code: 1

Script output:
 CScript Error: Can't find script engine "VBScript" for script "C:\PostgreSQL\8.4\installer\server\initcluster.vbs".

Script stderr:
 Program ended with an error exit code

Error running cscript //NoLogo "C:\PostgreSQL\8.4/installer/server/initcluster.vbs" "postgres" "postgres" "****" "C:\PostgreSQL\8.4" "C:\PostgreSQL\data" 5432 "DEFAULT" : Program ended with an error exit code
Problem running post-install step. Installation may not complete correctly
 The database cluster initialisation failed.
Creating Uninstaller
Creating uninstaller 25%
Creating uninstaller 50%
Creating uninstaller 75%

I have googled about this and run the command 'regsvr32 vbscript.dll' and it shows the message 'DllRegisterServer in vbscript.dll is succeeded', but it haven't solved my issue.

Also I set the default value for {B54F3741-5B07-11cf-A4B0-00AA004A55E8} in registry to the file path of vbscript.dll, but it also haven't solved my issue.

How to fix this issue?

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1  
Can you manually run .vbs scripts from the commandline? And why are you installing a version that is soon to be outdated? The current version is 9.1 with 9.2 on the doorstep –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 25 '12 at 21:34
    
8.4.*what* by the way? There have been a series of improvements to the installers. 8.4.12 is the latest, is that's what you're using? The newer versions should check for a working VBScript environment before running any scripts. Also: Is the log above from after you re-registered vbscript? If not, check the log again, you could be encountering a different issue. –  Craig Ringer Jul 26 '12 at 4:28
    
I have tried with 9.1 also, but the same result. This is the latest log after register the vbscript. –  shin Jul 26 '12 at 4:30
    
@shinod Gah, another weird system-specific piece of Windows brokenness then. Have you tried after disabling your antivirus scanner? If you don't have any luck here soon ask on pgsql-general and I'll poke Dave or one of the other EnterpriseDB installer guys. –  Craig Ringer Jul 26 '12 at 8:27
    
@CraigRinger I had avast antivirus, but I completely removed it, but I am not lucky. Any other solutions? –  shin Jul 26 '12 at 17:56

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Following link solve my issue

http://www.geekscribes.net/blog/2009/04/22/postgresql-database-cluster-initialisation-failed-solution/

The article text:

I’ll keep this one short and sweet. For those of you that have tried to install PostgreSQL (mine was 8.3.7-1) on Windows Vista and got the error Database Cluster Initialisation Failed error at the end of the install, read this.

The problem is that Vista has some safety features associated with setting permissions on the Program Files folder. Basically, even if you are an admin, you can’t change permissions on some folders like Program Files and Windows folder itself. This causes initdb to be unable to create some folders and the database cluster. What this means for you is that you need to install PostgreSQL in another folder that is not inside Program Files.

By the way, if you have forgotten your Postgres account password while installing the first time, just open a Command Prompt in Vista (If you don’t know how, Google for it). Then type the command “net user”. You will see a list of users on your computer. Find Postgre’s account. It’s usually “postgres“. Then you need to change its password by typing “net user postgres new_password” where new_password is… well, a new password for the account. You will be needing that postgres account during install. You will need admin privileges to do this change however.

Firstly, uninstall any failed installations. Use the Control Panel or the PostgreSQL installer in the install folder.

During the install, you will be prompted to choose where you want to install the program. Just select a location in another place. Like “C:\PostgreSQL” or something similar. It may even be on your desktop. But not inside Program Files. Not inside Windows folder. However, it’s not as easy. Bear with me.

After the install, you will still see that darned error message (or something like non-fatal error occured). Do not despair! (For Windows Power Users, we are just assigning Full Control permission to Postgres account on the new PostgreSQL install folder). For other users, read on if you don’t know how to do it.

Go to where you just installed PostgreSQL. In this case, the C: drive. There, right-click on the folder (usually called PostgreSQL), and go to Properties – Security tab. Click on the Edit button. You will now see some usernames and other stuff. Click on the Add button. In the “Enter the object names to select” box, enter “postgres” and press Check. Postgres’ user account should appear there. Click on Ok.

Now from the “Group or Usernames” box, select the Postgres account. In the window below, with lots of checkboxes, assign permission “Full Control” in the Allow Column to it. Note, if you don’t want to allow full control, just give it read/write. But I just went ahead and gave it Full Control. (I was tired and annoyed. The “World’s most advanced open source database” had failed to install!). Click on Ok and wait a bit for permissions to be applied.

Then, just do a re-install. Do not uninstall anything. Just run the setup again. It’ll say that a PostgreSQL install folder already exists and other stuff. Just click on Next until the install finishes. If you see “file cannot be copied” errors, click on the “ignore” button when needed.

That’s it. PostgreSQL should be up and running on Vista now. Hope it works for you too as it did for me, and that my guide is helpful to anybody. If it works, or if you have other solutions, let us know. Thanks for reading! :)

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Now the link does not work anymore. This is a perfect example why you should post answers here and not links! –  Valentin Despa Mar 23 '13 at 9:18
    
This works fine for me. Life saver. Thanks. –  sanjay Jan 2 at 6:04

I've pulled shin's link from the google cache:

Original link: http://www.geekscribes.net/blog/2009/04/22/postgresql-database-cluster-initialisation-failed-solution/

Cached link: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:RXu-5-ZzfcgJ:www.geekscribes.net/blog/2009/04/22/postgresql-database-cluster-initialisation-failed-solution/+&cd=3&hl=ro&ct=clnk


PostgreSQL Database Cluster Initialisation Failed Solution

I’ll keep this one short and sweet. For those of you that have tried to install PostgreSQL (mine was 8.3.7-1) on Windows Vista and got the error Database Cluster Initialisation Failed error at the end of the install, read this.

The problem is that Vista has some safety features associated with setting permissions on the Program Files folder. Basically, even if you are an admin, you can’t change permissions on some folders like Program Files and Windows folder itself. This causes initdb to be unable to create some folders and the database cluster. What this means for you is that you need to install PostgreSQL in another folder that is not inside Program Files.

By the way, if you have forgotten your Postgres account password while installing the first time, just open a Command Prompt in Vista (If you don’t know how, Google for it). Then type the command “net user”. You will see a list of users on your computer. Find Postgre’s account. It’s usually “postgres“. Then you need to change its password by typing “net user postgres new_password” where new_password is… well, a new password for the account. You will be needing that postgres account during install. You will need admin privileges to do this change however.

Firstly, uninstall any failed installations. Use the Control Panel or the PostgreSQL installer in the install folder.

During the install, you will be prompted to choose where you want to install the program. Just select a location in another place. Like “C:\PostgreSQL” or something similar. It may even be on your desktop. But not inside Program Files. Not inside Windows folder. However, it’s not as easy. Bear with me.

After the install, you will still see that darned error message (or something like non-fatal error occured). Do not despair! (For Windows Power Users, we are just assigning Full Control permission to Postgres account on the new PostgreSQL install folder). For other users, read on if you don’t know how to do it.

Go to where you just installed PostgreSQL. In this case, the C: drive. There, right-click on the folder (usually called PostgreSQL), and go to Properties – Security tab. Click on the Edit button. You will now see some usernames and other stuff. Click on the Add button. In the “Enter the object names to select” box, enter “postgres” and press Check. Postgres’ user account should appear there. Click on Ok.

Now from the “Group or Usernames” box, select the Postgres account. In the window below, with lots of checkboxes, assign permission “Full Control” in the Allow Column to it. Note, if you don’t want to allow full control, just give it read/write. But I just went ahead and gave it Full Control. (I was tired and annoyed. The “World’s most advanced open source database” had failed to install!). Click on Ok and wait a bit for permissions to be applied.

Then, just do a re-install. Do not uninstall anything. Just run the setup again. It’ll say that a PostgreSQL install folder already exists and other stuff. Just click on Next until the install finishes. If you see “file cannot be copied” errors, click on the “ignore” button when needed.

That’s it. PostgreSQL should be up and running on Vista now. Hope it works for you too as it did for me, and that my guide is helpful to anybody. If it works, or if you have other solutions, let us know. Thanks for reading!

share|improve this answer

I got the same result installing "postgresql-9.2.3-1-windows-x64.exe" on Windows 7 Enterprise and the problem get solved when I change the installation path.

Try to install into "c:\postgresql" instead of "c:\program files\Postgresql"

Good luck

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Your Windows install is a little borked, and you will need to re-register the VBScript engine to get the installer to run.

Edit: I'm blind, the post author had already tried this.

See:

http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Running_%26_Installing_PostgreSQL_On_Native_Windows#The_installer_exits_with_a_runtime_installation_error.3F

share|improve this answer
    
I have already gone through this link and done as it says in option 1. And it succeeded. But it haven't solve my issue. (I specified it in my question) –  shin Jul 26 '12 at 4:24
1  
@shinod Damn, I'm blind. sorry. –  Craig Ringer Jul 26 '12 at 4:26
    
Thanks for your help... –  shin Jul 26 '12 at 4:31

This message still occurs in Postgres v9.3.1.1.

For me, the problem was running the installer under the "Administrator" account. This doesn't work. Run it under an administrator account, avoiding the built-in "Administrator" account.

I don't really know what it's usually called, but it's the one that already exists on a fresh install; the one that cannot be changed to a Standard User; the one whose profile is stored in C:\Users\Administrator. Turns out it was a bad idea using this account; learned it the hard way.

(Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit)

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The installer should run under any Administrator account, unless you have some funky group policy set up. The server its self doesn't want to run under any account with admin rights for security reasons. –  Craig Ringer May 14 '14 at 5:02
    
@CraigRinger yeah, but it didn't for some reason. The box was more or less vanilla 2008 R2, not domain-joined, no funky group policies. –  romkyns May 14 '14 at 14:28

Solution:

• Uninstall PostgreSQL

• Run command: net user postgres /delete

• Click: Control Panel -> User Accounts -> Configure advanced user profile properties -> delete all “Unknown User” instances that seem to be left from PostgreSQL installation.

• Run: compmgmt.msc -> Click Local Users and Groups -> Users -> New User… -> User name: postgres, Password: postgrespass -> Create

• Run: compmgmt.msc -> Click Local Users and Groups -> Users -> postgres ->Member of -> Add… -> Administrators -> OK

• copy the PostgreSQL installer postgresql-8.4.9-1-windows.exe to C:\

• Run: runas /user:postgres cmd.exe -> cd \ -> postgresql-8.4.9-1-windows.exe -> installed successfully without errors. Checked data folder and confirmed files created successfully.

• Run: compmgmt.msc -> Local Users and Groups -> Users -> postgres -> Member of -> Administrators -> Remove

• Run: compmgmt.msc -> Local Users and Groups -> Users -> postgres -> Member of -> Add… -> Power Users -> OK

share|improve this answer
    
With an up-to-date Postgres version (9.x) the extra Windows user postgres is no longer needed. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 16 '14 at 16:05
    
Deleting the "postgres" user may break 3rd party extras on the system (pgagent, etc) so be prepared to reinstall other things too. –  Craig Ringer May 14 '14 at 5:02

For me the problem was that PATH variable did not have C:\Windows\system32 and so it did not find ICACLS command to change folder permissions. So the solution is to add C:\Windows\system32 to system PATH variable (if it does not contain it already):

  1. Control Panel -> System -> Advanced System Settings -> Advanced -> Environment Variables
  2. Under "System variable" find and select "Path"
  3. Click "Edit..."
  4. Now if value does not contain path to system32 append string ";C:\Windows\system32" (or wherever your windows path is)
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I had the same problem when trying to install PostgreSQL 9.3.5-3 on a Windows 7 x64 machine (not joined to a domain) in a folder, created on the root, with full access to everybody. The problem was solved by not using ä in my password, so avoid using non-English characters in your password.

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Hey guys the answer is very simple just install postgresql on another folder outside program files. it prompts a non fatal error and proceeds to with the installation...

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I have solved the same problem on Windows Server 2003 and postgres 9.2.9-3 by creating directory for installation beforehand, and giving full access on it to group "Users".

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